Garden Accessories

timber specs

Garden Accessories For Your Garden Shed

Make sure to include a budget for a few garden accessories such as wall hooks and brackets to hang your garden tools on. You must consider preparing a separate shed plan which features shelving, drawers, hooks etc., or buy a ready-made free-standing shelve from any local DIY store or online!

Given the enormous amount of discount  large garden shed plans available nowadays, your garden shed design does not need to be minimal  in any way. With numerous ways available to you to personalise the look of your shed, you just need to use your individual creative imaginations.

Color is the speediest and easiest way to transform the look and feel of your garden shed, blending them with the other garden accessories as per your individual taste, budget and preference. It’s completely your choice! There is so much to deem while purchasing or building your first large garden shed, but through making a little time and effort you can easily get the affordable large garden sheds that you’ve been dreaming of.

Some outside landscaping around your new Timber Building can make a tremendous difference and cost very little in some cases.

Simple thing like making a border around your Garden Shed and and filling it with a coloured Gravel will certainly brighten up that building.

 

Permited ​Development

planning permission

Permitted Development Details 

Permitted development rights allow householders to improve and extend their homes without the need to seek a specific planning permission where that would be out of proportion with the impact of works carried out. It is important that homeowners understand how they can exercise their rights to carry out development while protecting the interests their neighbours and the wider environment. The Department for Communities and Local Government has produced this technical guidance to help them. It is designed to be used by anyone who wants to understand more about the detailed rules on permitted development and the terms used in those rules. However, anyone who has no previous knowledge of permitted development issues will find it useful to look at the basic information on the Planning Portal first at: www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/responsibilities/planningpermission/permitted.

The guidance set out below was updated in January 2013 to clarify the position on solid wall insulation (see page 13), in October 2013 to reflect the time-limited changes to the size limits for rear extensions and the introduction of a neighbour consultation scheme for those larger extensions, both of which came into force in May 2013 (see page 17) and in April 2014 to clarify the position regarding the measurement of eaves in relation to the enlargement of a roof (see page 34). It gives an explanation of the rules on permitted development for householders, what these mean and how they should be applied in particular sets of circumstances. Diagrams have been included for illustrative purposes only and these are not drawn to scale. Given the very substantial variations in the design of individual houses, this guide cannot cover all possible situations that may arise. Where there is any doubt as to whether a development would be permitted development, advice should be sought from the local planning authority. To be certain that a proposed development is lawful and does not require an application for planning permission, it is possible to apply for a “Lawful Development Certificate” from the local authority. Further information on this can be found on the Planning Portal at: www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/next/lawfuldevelopmentcertificate,

Householder permitted development rights are set out in Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995 (“the 1995 Order”) and amended by the by the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No.2) (England) Order 20081, the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (England) Order 20132 and the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment and Consequential Provisions) (England) Order 20143. Part 1 of Schedule 2 to the 1995 Order (as amended in 2008, 2013 and 2014) sets out the permitted development rules concerning what extensions, improvements and alterations a householder may make to their house and the area around it without the need for an application for planning permission. Houses created through the permitted development rights to change use from shops, financial and professional services premises or agricultural buildings, which were introduced in April 2014, cannot use these permitted development rights to improve, alter or extend homes and planning permission should be sought.

1 2 3

This can be viewed at: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2008/2362/contents/made This can be viewed at: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/1101/contents/made This can be viewed at: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/564/contents/made

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General Issues

The 2008, 2013 and 2014 rules on household permitted development amend rules in the 1995 Order4. Some of the terms used in the amending rules remain are defined in the 1995 Order. These include:

“dwellinghouse” – does not include buildings containing one or more flats or a single flat contained within a building. Note, however, that for the purposes of this guidance, the word “house” is used rather than “dwellinghouse” unless the legislation is quoted directly.

“Building” – includes any part of a building and includes any structure or erection, but does not include mechanical plant or machinery or gates, fences, walls, or other means of enclosure.

“Original” – means a building as it existed on 1 July 1948 where it was built before that date, and as it was built when built after that date.

“Existing” – means a building as it existed immediately before any permitted development (eg a house extension) is undertaken. The existing house will include previous development to the house, whether undertaken as permitted development or as development resulting from a planning permission from the local authority.

“Height” – references to height (for example, the heights of the eaves on a house extension) is the height measured from ground level5. Ground level is the surface of the ground immediately adjacent to the building in question. Where ground level is not uniform (eg if the ground is sloping), then the ground level is the highest part of the surface of the ground next to the building.

“Article 1(5) land” – this is land within a National Park, the Broads, an area of outstanding natural beauty, an area designated as a conservation area, and land within World Heritage Sites.

4 5

The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995. This can be viewed in an unamended form at: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1995/418/contents/made This will be the level of the natural ground and would not include any addition laid on top of the natural ground such as a patio.

The structure of the rules on permitted development

The rules on permitted development are sub-divided into a series of “Parts”. Part 1 specifically deals with development within the curtilage of a house (this is usually the area of land within which the house sits, but for some houses, may be a smaller area). Part 1 is then sub-divided into Classes covering various types of development:

Class A covers the enlargement, improvement or alterations to a house such as rear or side extensions as well as general alterations such as new windows and doors, and from 30 May 2013 to 30 May 2016 a neighbour consultation scheme for larger rear extensions.

Class B covers additions or alterations to roofs which enlarge the house such as loft conversions involving dormer windows.

Class C covers other alterations to roofs such as re-roofing or the installation of roof lights.

Class D covers the erection of a porch outside an external door.
Class E covers the provision of buildings and other development on land

surrounding the house (the “curtilage”).

Class F covers the provision of hard surfaces on land surrounding the house such as driveways.

Class G covers the installation, alteration, or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe.

Class H covers the installation, alteration, or replacement of microwave antenna such as satellite dishes.

There are also other Parts of the rules that may be relevant to householders. For example Part 2 covers matters such as erection or construction of gates, fences and walls. Part 40 covers the installation of domestic microgeneration equipment (such as solar panels).

When considering whether a development proposal is permitted development, all of the relevant Parts of the rules and all the Classes within those Parts need to be taken into account. So whilst Part 1 Class A prevents the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe from being permitted development, Class G includes such development as permitted development subject to the rules set out under that Class.

Similarly, changes to the roof of a house are not permitted development under Class A, but may be permitted development under Class B or C. For example, where a proposed two storey extension at the rear of a house has a roof that joins onto the main roof of the original house, the works will need to meet the requirements of both Class A (which covers the enlargement of the house) and Class C (which covers any

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alterations to the roof) in order to be permitted development. If the works also include the creation of a dormer window to enlarge the roof space, either in the extension or the original roof space, then they would also need to meet the requirements of Class B.

In order to be permitted development, a proposal must meet all the limitations and conditions under the Classes relevant to the proposal.

It is therefore essential that any proposed household development is considered in the context of the permitted development rules as a whole in order to determine whether it benefits from permitted development rights and therefore does not require an application for planning permission.

Further restrictions on permitted development

A local planning authority may have removed some permitted development rights by issuing what is known as an Article 4 Direction or may have removed those rights on the original, or any subsequent, planning permission for the house. This will mean a planning application will be needed for development which normally does not need one. Before undertaking any development, checks should be undertaken with the local planning authority to determine whether any restrictions on permitted development have been made.

The remainder of this guidance provides further explanation about the detailed rules covering what improvements can be made to a house and its surroundings as permitted development. In particular, it provides more details on the limits (eg on size) and the conditions that will need to be complied with if development is to take place without the need for an application for planning permission. The guidance covers in detail Classes A-E of the rules which cover common development projects such as extensions, loft conversions, alterations to a roof, porches, and buildings on land surrounding the house. The rules for Classes F-H are included in this document; detailed guidance on them is not included, although cross-references are included to other guidance published by CLG.

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Class A

This provides permitted development rights for the enlargement, improvement or other alteration of a house.

Under Class A the following limits and conditions apply:

A.1 Development is not permitted by Class A if –

(a) as a result of the works, the total area of ground covered by buildings within the curtilage of the dwellinghouse (other than the original dwellinghouse) would exceed 50% of the total area of the curtilage (excluding the ground area of the original dwellinghouse)

Extensions (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the “curtilage”. What is defined as the curtilage for a particular house will vary according to a number of factors, but in most cases it will comprise the area of land around the original house (ie what is understood to be the garden/grounds of the house). But the curtilage may be a smaller area in some cases, especially in the case of properties with large grounds set in the countryside.

The 50% limit covers all buildings so will include existing and proposed outbuildings as well as any existing or proposed new extensions to a house. It will exclude the area covered by the house itself but will include any separate detached buildings built prior to 1948 (eg a detached garage).

In the diagram below, the maximum area that can be built on as permitted development, whether as an extension to the house, or outbuildings erected under Class E would be 50% of the white area.

Curtilage of house

Original house

(b) the height of the part of the dwellinghouse enlarged, improved or altered would exceed the height of the highest part of the roof of the existing dwellinghouse

Any enlargement, improvement, or alteration to a house must not exceed the height of the highest part of the roof of the existing house. If it does, an application for planning permission will be required.

The highest part of the roof of the existing dwelling house will be the height of the ridge line of the main roof (even though there may be other ridge lines at a lower level) or the height of the highest roof where roofs on a building are flat.

Chimneys, firewalls, parapet walls and other protrusions above the main roof ridge line should not be taken into account when considering the height of the highest part of the roof of the existing house.

However, when calculating the height of the part of the house enlarged, this measurement should be at the highest part of the enlargement and should include any protrusions above the roof such as parapet walls etc.

(c) the height of the eaves of the part of the dwellinghouse enlarged, improved or altered would exceed the height of the eaves of the existing dwellinghouse

For the purpose of measuring height, the eaves of a house are the point where the lowest point of a roof slope, or a flat roof, meets the outside wall.

The height of the eaves will be measured from the natural ground level at the base of the external wall of the extension to the point where the external wall would meet (if projected upwards) the upper surface of the roof slope. Parapet walls and overhanging parts of eaves should not be included in any calculation of eaves height.

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The following example shows the side view of an extension with a pitched roof:

Roof of enlarged part of house

Where there is a flat roof, a similar approach should be taken for measuring eaves:

Flat roof Parapet Wall

Eaves height is measured from the ground level at the base of the outside wall to the point where that wall would meet the upper surface of the flat roof – the overhang and the parapet wall should be ignored for the purposes of measurement.

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Eaves height is measured from ground level at the base of the outside wall to the point where that wall would meet the upper surface of the roof slope – the overhang should be ignored for the purposes of measurement.

Where the existing house has eaves of different heights, then the restriction on the height of the eaves for the part of the house enlarged, improved or altered is measured against the highest level of eaves on the existing house. However, where a house is built on sloping ground, the height of the eaves on the existing house should be measured in terms of the elevation from which any extension of a house is to be made.

The eaves of any extension can not be above the horizontal level of this line on this elevation of the house.

The eaves of any extension can not be above the horizontal level of this line on this elevation of the house.

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(d) the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would extend beyond a wall which –

  1. (i)  fronts a highway, and
  2. (ii)  forms either the principal elevation or a side elevation of the original dwellinghouse

This restriction means that any development to enlarge a dwelling house that is in front of a principal or side wall that fronts a highway will require an application for planning permission.

The installation of solid wall insulation constitutes an improvement rather than an enlargement or extension to the dwellinghouse and is not caught by the provisions of d(i) and d(ii).

In most cases, the principal elevation will be that part of the house which fronts (directly or at an angle) the main highway serving the house (the main highway will be the one that sets the postcode for the house concerned). It will usually contain the main architectural features such as main bay windows or a porch serving the main entrance to the house. Usually, but not exclusively, the principal elevation will be what is understood to be the front of the house.

There will only be one principal elevation on a house. Where there are two elevations which may have the character of a principal elevation (for example, on a corner plot), a view will need to be taken as to which of these forms the principal elevation. Note, however, that in such cases the second elevation will also be subject to the restrictions under Class A if it is a side elevation and fronts a highway.

In this context, “extend beyond a wall” comprises not only the area immediately in front of the wall, but also an area in front of a line drawn from the end of the wall to the boundary of the property. In the diagram below, neither extension shown would be permitted development – they both extend beyond a wall forming a principal elevation that fronts a highway.

Principal Elevation

Original house

These extensions would not be permitted development

Any development between this line and the highway will require an application for planning permission

Boundary of property

Highway

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The principal elevation could include more than one wall facing in the same direction – for example, where there are large bay windows on the front elevation, or where there is an ‘L’ shaped frontage. In such cases, all such walls will form the principal elevation and the line for determining what constitutes “extends beyond a wall” will follow these walls.

Principal Elevation

Any development between this line and the highway will not be permitted development and will require an application for planning permission

Bay windows from part of principal elevation

Highway

Walls Forming Principal Elevation

Any development between this line and the highway will not be permitted development and will require an application for planning permission

Highway

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If a house lies on a corner plot where a side elevation also fronts a highway, there will be an additional restriction on permitted development to the side of the house.

Original house

These extensions would not be permitted development

Any development between these lines and the highways at the front and side of the house will
require an application for

planning permission Boundary of property

Principal Elevation

A highway will usually include public roads (whether adopted or not) as well as public footpaths and bridleways, but would not include private driveways. The extent to which an elevation of a house fronts a highway will depend on factors such as:

  1. (i)  the angle between the elevation of the house and the highway. If that angle is more than 45 degrees, then the elevation will not be fronting a highway;
  2. (ii)  the distance between the house and the highway – in cases where that distance is substantial, it is unlikely that a building can be said to ”front” the highway. The same may be true where there is a significant intervening area of land in different ownership or use between the boundary of the curtilage of the house concerned and the highway.

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Highways

(e) the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have a single storey and –

  1. (i)  extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse by more than 4 metres in the case of a detached dwellinghouse, or 3 metres in the case of any other dwellinghouse, or
  2. (ii)  exceed 4 metres in height

A single-storey extension must not extend beyond the rear of the original house by more than four metres if a detached house, or by more than three metres in any other case. In both cases, the total height of the extension must not be more than 4 metres. The rear wall or walls of a house will be those which are directly opposite the front of the house.

Measurement of the extension beyond the rear wall should be made from the base of the rear wall of the original house to the outer edge of the wall of the extension (not including any guttering or barge boards).

Measurement of “extend beyond a rear wall” when the extension is directly attached to the rear wall

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(ea) until 30th May 2016, for a dwellinghouse not on article 1(5) land nor on a site of special scientific interest, the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have a single storey and –

  1. (i)  extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse by more than 8 metres in the case of a detached dwellinghouse, or 6 metres in the case of any other dwellinghouse, or
  2. (ii)  exceed 4 metres in height

From 30 May 2013 until 30 May 2016 a single-storey extension can be larger than allowed under paragraph (e) above: it must not extend beyond the rear of the original house by more than eight metres if a detached house, or by more than six metres in any other case. These larger extensions are not allowed for dwellinghouses on article 1(5) land or on a site of special scientific interest. The height restriction remains the same: the extension must not be more than 4 metres high. The rear wall or walls of a house will be those which are directly opposite the front of the house. It remains the case that development is not permitted if, as a result of the works, the total area of ground covered by extensions and other buildings within the curtilage of the dwellinghouse would exceed 50% of the curtilage of the original dwellinghouse excluding the ground area of the original dwellinghouse (see paragraph (a) above).

These larger single-storey extensions, extending beyond the rear of the original house by more than four eight metres and less than eight metres if a detached house, or by more than three metres and less than six metres in any other case, are subject to a neighbour consultation scheme for the impact of the proposed development on the amenity of their property. The requirements of the neighbour consultation scheme are set out in paragraph A.4 of Class A.

Householders wishing to build a larger extension have to notify the local planning authority about the proposed extension and the local planning authority must give adjoining neighbours notice of the proposals and the opportunity to object. Works cannot commence until the local planning authority notifies the householder that no prior approval is required, or gives prior approval, or 42 days have passed without any decision by the local planning authority. Works must be completed by 30 May 2016 and the local planning authority must be notified of their completion. Further information on the operation of the neighbour consultation scheme and the Notification Form for a proposed larger home extension can be found on the Planning Portal at: http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/extensions#ncs

Single-storey extensions that do not extend beyond the rear of the original house by more than four metres if a detached house, or by more than three metres in any other case, (as set out in paragraph (e) above) are not subject to a neighbour consultation scheme.

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Where the original rear wall of a house is stepped, then each of these walls will form “the rear wall of the original dwelling house”. In such cases, the limits on extensions apply to any of the rear walls being extended beyond. In the example below showing a plan of a semi-detached house with an original “stepped” rear, each of the extensions (shaded) would meet the requirements for a single story extension as they do not extend more than three metres beyond the rear wall (or until 30 May 2016 more than six metres, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific interest where the three metre limit remains in place).

3m

3m 3m

However, the extension shown below would not meet the requirements for permitted development. In the case of rear walls ‘A’ and ‘B’, the extension goes more than three metres beyond those walls (or until 30 May 2016 more than six metres, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific interest where the three metre limit remains in place).

:

3m

A
B

X

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Side wall extensions extending beyond rear walls

An extension on a side wall that extends beyond a rear wall, but is not attached to a rear wall will be subject to the restrictions that apply to rear walls as well the restrictions on side walls (these are covered under section (h) of the rules – see below). So in the example below, the extension is limited to three metres (or until 30 May 2016 six metres, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific interest where the three metre limit remains in place) beyond the rear wall of the semi-detached house as well as being restricted by the limits set for extensions from side walls (i.e. the extension can be no more than half the width of the house, single storey, and maximum of four metres high).

3m

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f) the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have more than one storey and –

  1. (i)  extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse by more than 3 metres, or
  2. (ii)  be within 7 metres of any boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse opposite the rear wall of the dwellinghouse

The term “more than one storey” applies to the part of the house being enlarged through permitted development. This could either be a two storey extension to a house, or might comprise the addition of a storey onto an existing part of the house – for example, the addition of a second storey onto an existing single storey part of the house. The enlarged part of the house must not extend beyond the rear wall by more than three metres if it is to qualify as permitted development. Measurement of the extension beyond the rear wall should be made from the base of the rear wall of the original house that the enlargement extends beyond. Again, this limit applies to any rear wall being built out from (see diagrams under (e) above).

The limits applying to an enlargement of a house by more than one storey will apply in all cases where the enlarged part of the dwelling house includes any part that is of more than one storey. So the following, showing a side view of a detached house, would not be permitted development – the extended part of the house includes more than one storey and the ground floor part extends by more than three metres from the rear wall of the house.

Front

3m

4m

Rear

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X

Similarly, if a detached house has an existing, single storey, ground floor extension that was not part of the original house and which extended beyond the rear wall by more than three metres, then it would not be possible to add an additional first floor extension above this without an application for planning permission – because the enlarged part of the house would then consist of more than one storey and would extend beyond a rear wall by more than three metres.

New extension at first floor would not be permitted development

Rear

Previously added rear extension

In addition, where the extension or enlarged part of the house has more than one storey, it must be a minimum of seven metres away from the boundary of the land surrounding any house opposite. For example:

Front

3m

X

4m

7m

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7m

(g) the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would be within 2 metres of the boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse, and the height of the eaves of the enlarged part would exceed 3 metres

Where any part of a proposed extension to a house is within two metres of the boundary of the land surrounding the property, then the maximum height of the eaves that is allowed for all parts of the proposal is three metres.

Guidance on measurement of height of eaves is covered under section (c) above.

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(h) the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would extend beyond a wall forming a side elevation of the original dwellinghouse, and would –

  1. (i)  exceed 4 metres in height,
  2. (ii)  have more than one storey, or
  3. (iii)  have a width greater than half the width of the original dwellinghouse

A wall forming a side elevation of a house will be any wall that cannot be identified as being a front wall or a rear wall. Houses will often have more than two side elevation walls. For example:

These are all walls forming a side elevation

Where an extension is beyond any side wall, the restrictions in (h) will apply. Any extension can only be a single storey, is limited to four metres in height and can only be half the width of the original house. The width of the original house should be calculated at its widest point.

Rear and side extensions

Where an extension fills the area between a side elevation and a rear wall, then the restrictions on extensions beyond rear walls and side walls will apply. The extension must:

  1. (i)  extend no more than three metres beyond the rear wall, or no more than four metres in the case of a detached house (or until 30 May 2016 no more than six metres beyond the rear wall, or eight metres for a detached house, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific interest where the three and four metre limits remains in place),
  2. (ii)  be a single storey and must not exceed four metres in height;
  3. (iii)  have a total width that does not exceed more half the width of the house.

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For example:

No more than half width of original house

3m

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

3m

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In the following example, although the extension is less than half the width of the original house and extends beyond the rear wall at “A’’ by only three metres (or until 30 May 2016 six metres, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific where the three metre limit remains), it extends beyond the rear wall ‘B’ by more than three metres (or until 30 May 2016 six metres, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific where the three metre limit remains). It would therefore not be permitted development and will require an application for planning permission.

No more than half width of original house

A

B

3m

Extends more than 3m beyond wall B

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

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X

In other cases, an extension may comprise both elements of a rear and side

extension.

Examples could include:

3m 3m

No more than half width of original house

3m

3m no more than 1⁄2 width of house

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

No more than half width of original house

3m

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

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In the two examples above, the extensions would need to meet the relevant criteria for side and rear extensions i.e.:

  1. (i)  the extension must extend no more than three metres beyond the rear wall (or until 30 May 2016 no more than six metres, except on article 1(5) land or sites of special scientific where the three metre limit remains);
  2. (ii)  it can only be a single storey and cannot exceed four metres in height;
  3. (iii)  the width of that part of the extension cannot exceed more half the width ofthe house (measured at its widest point).

The following examples, however, would not be permitted development. In each case, the extension extends beyond a side wall and is more than half the width of the

original house.

An application for planning permission would therefore be required.

More than half width of original house

3m

X

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

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3m

More than half width of original house

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

In some situations, it may be that permitted development is undertaken in separate stages, for example, a side extension may be built first, and then a rear extension

added at a later date.

For example:

Enlarged part of house (A+B) is now more than half width of original house

3m

BA

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

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X

X

In the example above, if the side extension (A) was built first, it would meet the requirement for being no more than half of the width of the original house. However, the later addition of the rear extension (B) would mean that the total width would be more than half the width of the house. The rear extension would therefore require an application for planning permission.

The next example would be permitted development. The original side extension (A) extends beyond a side wall by no more than half the width of the original house and would be permitted development (subject to meeting the other rules that are relevant under Class A). If the rear extension (B) is added at a later date, it has no effect on the width of the side extension (it does not join it). The enlarged part of the house therefore continues to be less than half the width of the house and therefore permitted development.

3m

B

A

Enlarged
part of
house (A)
that
extends beyond

side wall of house remains less than half width of the original house

This is the width of the original house (measured at widest point) for the purpose of calculating the “half width” limit for the extension

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or
(i) it would consist of or include –

  1. (i)  the construction or provision of a veranda, balcony or raised platform,
  2. (ii)  the installation, alteration or replacement of a microwave antenna,
  3. (iii)  the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe, or
  4. (iv)  an alteration to any part of the roof of the dwellinghouse

Verandas, balconies and raised platforms are not permitted development and will require planning permission.

A veranda is usually defined as a gallery, platform, or balcony, usually roofed and often partly enclosed, extending along the outside of a building at ground level.

A balcony is defined as a platform with a rail, ballustrade or parapet projecting outside an upper storey of a building. A “Juliet” balcony, where there is no platform and therefore no external access would normally be permitted development.

A raised platform is any platform with a height greater than 300 millimetres and will include roof terraces.

Although the items set out in (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) are not permitted development under Class A of the rules, some may be permitted development under other Classes subject to the limitations and conditions set out in those classes:

Class E covers provision of a “building” within the area around the house required for a purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the house. A “Building” – includes any part of a building and includes any structure or erection – and would include platforms (for example garden decking) less than 300mm high.

Class H covers the installation, alteration or replacement of a microwave antenna;

Class G covers the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe;

Class B covers enlargement of houses through alterations or additions to the roof and Class C covers other alterations to the roof of a house.

Where an extension to a house under Class A includes works that would require an alteration to the existing roof of the house (eg where the roof of the extension joins the existing roof), the alterations to the existing roof of the house will need to meet the requirements of Class B or C (as appropriate) in order to be permitted development.

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A.2 In the case of a dwellinghouse on article 1(5) land, development is not permitted by Class A if –

  1. (a)  it would consist of or include the cladding of any part of the exterior of the dwellinghouse with stone, artificial stone, pebble dash, render, timber, plastic or tiles;
  2. (b)  the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would extend beyond a wall forming a side elevation of the original dwellinghouse; or
  3. (c)  the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse would have more than one storey and extend beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse

This section of the rules sets out additional restrictions for National Parks, the Broads, areas of outstanding natural beauty, conservation areas, and land within World Heritage Sites. In these areas:

  • the cladding of any part of a house, whether it be the original house or any enlargement is not permitted development and requires an application for planning permission
  • extensions beyond any side wall are not permitted development in these areas
  • an extension from a rear wall is not permitted development if it results in an enlarged area of the house that has more than one storey.Conditions

A.3 Development is permitted by Class A subject to the following conditions-

(a) the materials used in any exterior work (other than materials used in the construction of a conservatory) shall be of a similar appearance to those used in the construction of the exterior of the existing dwellinghouse

The condition above is intended to ensure that any works to enlarge, alter or improve a house result in an appearance that minimises visual impact and is sympathetic to existing development. This means that the materials used should be of similar visual appearance to those in the existing house, but does not mean that they need to be the same materials. For example:

  • the external walls of an extension should be constructed of materials that provide a similar visual appearance – for example in terms of colour and style of brick used – to the materials used in existing house walls
  • a pitched roof on an extension should be clad in tiles that give a similar visual appearance to those used on the existing house roof. Again, colour and style

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will be important considerations; flat roofs will not normally have any visual impact and so the need for materials of similar appearance should not apply

• it may be appropriate to include new PVC double glazed windows in an extension even if there are no such windows in the existing house. What is important is that they give a similar visual appearance to those in the existing house, for example in terms of their overall shape, and the colour and size of the frames.

This condition does not apply to conservatories.

b) any upper-floor window located in a wall or roof slope forming a side elevation of the dwellinghouse shall be –

  1. (i)  obscure-glazed, and
  2. (ii)  non-opening unless the parts of the window which can be

opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which the window is installed

This condition requires upper-floor windows in any part of the side of a house to be obscure glazed. Glazing to provide privacy is normally rated on a scale of 1-5, with 5 providing the most privacy. To be permitted development, side windows should be obscure glazed to minimum of level 3. Obscure glazing does not include one-way glass.

Where such a window is on a staircase or landing (ie not in a room) the 1.7 metre measurement should be made from the stair or point on a landing immediately below the centre of the window, upwards to the opening part of the window.

Opening part of window

Minimum of 1.7 metres from centre of opening part of window to stair

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For example:

(c) where the enlarged part of the dwellinghouse has more than one storey, the roof pitch of the enlarged part shall, so far as practicable, be the same as the roof pitch of the original dwellinghouse

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Roof pitch on extension is same as that on original house

Class B

This provides permitted development rights for the enlargement of a house consisting of an addition or alteration to its roof.

Under Class B the following limits and conditions apply:

B.1 Development is not permitted by Class B if –

(a) any part of the dwellinghouse would, as a result of the works, exceed the height of the highest part of the existing roof

Additions and alterations made to a roof to enlarge a house (eg a loft conversion or the replacement of an existing flat roof with a pitched roof) will only be permitted development if no part of the house once enlarged exceeds the height of the highest part of the roof of the existing house. If it does, planning permission will be required.

The highest part of the roof of the existing dwelling house will be the height of the ridge line of the main roof (even though there may be other ridge lines at a lower level) or the height of the highest roof where roofs on a building are flat.

Chimneys, firewalls, parapet walls and other protrusions above the main roof ridge line should not be taken into account when considering the height of the highest part of the roof of the existing house.

(b) any part of the dwellinghouse would, as a result of the works, extend beyond the plane of any existing roof slope which forms the principal elevation of the dwellinghouse and fronts a highway

The effect of this is that dormer windows as part of a loft conversion, or any other enlargement of the roof space, are not permitted development on a principal elevation that fronts a highway and will therefore require an application for planning permission. Roof-lights in a loft conversion on a principal elevation may however be permitted development as long as they meet the requirements set out under Class C (see below).

In most cases, the principal elevation will be that part of the house which faces (directly or at an angle) the main highway serving the house (the main highway will be the one that sets the postcode for the house concerned). It will usually contain the main architectural features such as main bay windows or a porch serving the main entrance to the house. Usually, but not exclusively, the principal elevation will be what is understood to be the front of the house.

There will only be one principal elevation on a house. Where there are two elevations which may have the character of a principal elevation (for example, on a corner plot), a view will need to be taken as to which of these forms the principal elevation.

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The principal elevation could include more than one roof slope facing in the same direction – for example, where there are large bay windows on the front elevation, or where there is an ‘L’ shaped frontage. In such cases, all such roof slopes will form the principal elevation and the line for determining what constitutes “extends beyond the plane of any existing roof slope” will follow these slopes (see guidance on Class A (d) for an illustration of this).

A highway will usually include public roads (whether adopted or not) as well as public footpaths and bridleways, but would not include private driveways. The extent to which an elevation of a house fronts a highway will depend on factors such as:

  1. (i)  the angle between the elevation of the house and the highway. If that angle is more than 45 degrees, then the elevation will not be fronting a highway;
  2. (ii)  the distance between the house and the highway – in cases where that distance is substantial, it is unlikely that a building can be said to ‘front’ the highway. The same may be true where there is a significant intervening area of land in different ownership or use between the boundary of the curtilage of the house concerned and the highway.

(c) the cubic content of the resulting roof space would exceed the cubic content of the original roof space by more than –

(i) 40 cubic metres in the case of a terrace house, or

(ii) 50 cubic metres in any other case

For the purposes of Class B “resulting roof space” means the roof space as enlarged, taking into account any enlargement to the original roof space, whether permitted by this Class or not.

To be permitted development any additional roof space created must not increase the volume of the original roof space of the house by more than 40 cubic metres for terraced houses and 50 cubic metres for semi-detached and detached houses. Any previous enlargement to the original roof space in any part of the house must be included in this volume allowance. ‘Terrace house’ is defined in the legislation under the section ‘Interpretation of Part 1’ – set out at the end of this guidance.

‘Original roof space’ will be that roof space in the “original building” (see ‘General Issues’ section of this document above for the definition of this).

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(d) it would consist of or include –

(i) the construction or provision of a veranda, balcony or raised platform, or

(ii) the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe

Alterations to the roof of a house for loft conversions involving the creation of balconies are not permitted development and will require planning permission. A balcony is defined as a platform with a rail, ballustrade or parapet projecting outside an upper storey of a building. A ‘Juliet’ balcony, where there is no platform and therefore no external access, would be permitted development. A raised platform is any platform with a height greater than 300 millimetres and would include roof terraces.

Installation, alteration or replacement of chimneys, flues or soil and vent pipes will often be necessary when loft conversions are undertaken. Whilst these are not permitted development under Class B of these rules, they may be permitted development under Class G.

(e) the dwellinghouse is on article 1(5) land

In National Parks, the Broads, areas of outstanding natural beauty, conservation areas, and land within World Heritage Sites, roof extensions are not permitted development and will require an application for planning permission.

Conditions

B.2 Development is permitted by Class B subject to the following conditions –

(a) the materials used in any exterior work shall be of a similar appearance to those used in the construction of the exterior of the existing dwellinghouse

This condition is intended to ensure that any addition or alteration to a roof for a loft conversion results in an appearance that minimises visual impact and is sympathetic to the existing house. This means that the materials used should be of similar visual appearance to those in the existing house, but does not mean that they need to be the same materials or match exactly. The visual impacts of the materials used will the most important consideration. For example:

  • the flat roofs of dormer windows will not normally have any visual impact and so the use of materials such as felt, lead or zinc for flat roofs of dormers will therefore be acceptable
  • the face and sides of a dormer window should be finished using materials that give a similar visual appearance to existing house. So the materials used for facing a dormer should appear to be of similar colour and design to the

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(b)

materials used in the main roof of the house when viewed from ground level. Window frames should also be similar to those in the existing house in terms of their colour and overall shape.

the enlargement shall be constructed so that –

(i) other than in the case of a hip-to-gable enlargement or an enlargement which joins the original roof to the roof of a rear or side extension –

(aa) the eaves of the original roof are maintained or reinstated; and

(bb) the edge of the enlargement closest to the eaves of the original roof shall, so far as practicable, be not less than 20 centimetres from the eaves, measured along the roof slope from the outside edge of the eaves; and

(ii) other than in the case of an enlargement which joins the original roof to the roof of a rear or side extension, no part of the enlargement extends beyond the outside face of any external wall of the original dwellinghouse

It is sometimes necessary to remove the eaves of the original roof while works are carried out. To be permitted development eaves that are temporarily removed should be reinstated.

The measurement of 20cm should be made along the original roof slope from the outermost edge of the eaves (the edge of the tiles or slates) to the edge of the enlargement. Any guttering that protrudes beyond the roof slope should not be included in this measurement.

Minimum of 20cm from eaves to edge of enlargement to be measured along the roof slope from the edge of the enlargement to the outer edge of the eaves

The enlargement cannot overhang the outer face of the wall of the original house.

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This 20cm set back will be required unless it can be demonstrated that this is not possible due to practical or structural considerations. One circumstance where it will not prove practical to maintain this 20cm distance will be where a dormer on a side extension of a house joins an existing, or proposed, dormer on the main roof of the house.

The enlarged part of the roof must not extend beyond the outer face of any wall of the original house if it is to qualify as permitted development. An interpretative provision at paragraph B.4 of Class B clarifies that for these purposes any roof tiles, guttering, fascias, barge boards or other minor roof details which overhang the outer face of the wall should not to be considered part of the roof enlargement.

(c) any window inserted on a wall or roof slope forming a side elevation of the dwellinghouse shall be –

(i) obscure-glazed, and

(ii) non-opening unless the parts of the window which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which the window is installed

Windows for a loft extension on a side elevation of a house must be obscure glazed to benefit from permitted development. Glazing to provide privacy is normally rated on a scale of 1-5, with 5 providing the most privacy. To be permitted development, side windows should be obscure glazed to minimum of level 3. Obscure glazed does not include one-way glass.

Where such a window is on a staircase or landing (ie not in a room) the 1.7 metre measurement should be made from the stair or point on a landing immediately below the centre of the window, upwards to the opening part of the window (see diagram under Class A – A.3 (b) above).

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Class C

This provides permitted development rights for any other alteration to the roof of a house.

Such alterations will not involve any enlargement of the house, but would, for example, cover the installation of rooflights.

Under Class C the following limits and conditions apply:

C.1 Development is not permitted by Class C if –

(a) the alteration would protrude more than 150 millimetres beyond the plane of the slope of the original roof when measured from the perpendicular with the external surface of the original roof

Any protrusion from a roof, for example, for a rooflight and its frame, will be limited to 150mm:

Roof Slope

(not to scale)

No more than 150 millimetres

This limitation to projection from the roof plane should not be applied in cases where the roof of an extension to a house that is permitted development under Class A is joined to the roof of the original house. In such cases, the roof of the extension should not be considered as protruding from the original roof.

  1. (b)  it would result in the highest part of the alteration being higher than the highest part of the original roof; or
  2. (c)  it would consist of or include-(i) the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe, or

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Guidance on these limits is covered under Class B above and will also apply to development under Class C. Note, however, that in the case of Class C, measurement of height is made against the original roof and not as in Class B where it is the existing roof.

(ii) the installation, alteration or replacement of solar photovoltaics or solar thermal equipment

Although solar photovoltaics and solar thermal equipment (ie solar panels) are not permitted development under Class C, they may not require an application for planning permission if they meet the requirements set out under Part 40 of the rules on permitted development.

Conditions

C.2 Development is permitted by Class C subject to the condition that any window located on a roof slope forming a side elevation of the dwellinghouse shall be –

(a) obscure-glazed; and

(b) non-opening unless the parts of the window which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which the window is installed

Guidance on these conditions is covered under Class B above and will also apply to development under Class C.

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Class D

This provides permitted development rights for the erection of a porch outside any external door of a dwellinghouse.

Development is not permitted by Class D if –

  1. (a)  the ground area (measured externally) of the structure would exceed 3 square metres
  2. (b)  any part of the structure would be more than 3 metres above ground level or
  3. (c)  any part of the structure would be within 2 metres of any boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse with a highway

These rules are illustrated on the Planning Portal:

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/porch/miniguide

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Class E

This provides permitted development rights within the area surrounding a house (‘the curtilage’) for:

  1. (a)  any building or enclosure, swimming or other pool required for a purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse as such, or the maintenance, improvement or other alteration of such a building or enclosure or
  2. (b)  a container used for domestic heating purposes for the storage of oil or liquid petroleum gas

Class E sets out the rules on permitted development for buildings etc within the area of land surrounding a house (guidance under Class A above (A.1 (a)) describes what will be the “curtilage”). Buildings should not be attached to the house and should be built for purposes incidental to the enjoyment of the house. Paragraph E.4 of Class E indicates that purposes incidental to the enjoyment of the house includes the keeping of poultry, bees, pet animals, birds or other livestock for the domestic needs or personal enjoyment of the occupants of the house.

But the rules also allow, subject to the conditions and limitations below, a large range of other buildings on land surrounding a house. Examples could include common buildings such as garden sheds, other storage buildings, garages, and garden decking as long as they can be properly be described as having a purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the house. A purpose incidental to a dwelling house would not, however, cover normal residential uses, such as separate self-contained accommodation nor the use of an outbuilding for primary living accommodation such as a bedroom, bathroom, or kitchen.

Under Class E, the following limits and conditions apply:

E.1 Development is not permitted by Class E if –

(a) the total area of ground covered by buildings, enclosures and containers within the curtilage (other than the original dwellinghouse) would exceed 50% of the total area of the curtilage (excluding the ground area of the original dwellinghouse)

The total area of ground around the house covered by buildings, enclosures and containers must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. The 50% figure must also take account of any extensions to the original house under Class A of the permitted development rules or any extension to the original house that has been granted planning permission. The 50% limit excludes the area covered by the house as originally built but does include any separate detached buildings built prior to 1948 (e.g. a detached garage).

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b) any part of the building, enclosure, pool or container would be situated on land forward of a wall forming the principal elevation of the original dwellinghouse

The guidance on Class A permitted developments – section (d) – describes what will be the principal elevation of a house.

‘Forward of a wall forming the principal elevation’ means that development is not permitted under Class E in any area in front of the principal elevation of a house. It also prevents permitted development anywhere in front of a hypothetical line drawn through the principal elevation to the side boundary of the land surrounding the house. For example:

Principal elevation

Original house

These developments would not be permitted development under Class E

Any development between this line and the highway will require an application
for planning permission

Boundary of property

Where the principal elevation comprises more than one wall facing in the same direction, all such walls will form part of the principal elevation and the line for determining what constitutes ‘extends beyond a wall’ will follow these walls:

Highway

Walls forming principal elevation

Any development between this line and the highway will not be permitted development and will require an application for planning permission

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Highway

(c) the building would have more than one storey

Any buildings within the curtilage can only have one storey. Buildings with more than storey are not permitted development and will require an application for planning permission.

d) the height of the building, enclosure or container would exceed –

  1. (i)  4 metres in the case of a building with a dual-pitched roof,
  2. (ii)  2.5 metres in the case of a building, enclosure or container within 2 metres of the boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse, or
  3. (iii)  3 metres in any other case

The height of the building, enclosure or container should be measured from the ground level immediately adjacent to the building, enclosure, or container to its highest point.

The height limit on a “dual-pitched roof” of four metres should also be applied to buildings that have “hipped” roofs (slopes on all four sides)

If any part of the building, container or enclosure is within two metres of the boundary of the area around then house, then the height limit for the whole development is restricted to 2.5 metres if it is to be permitted development.

(e) the height of the eaves of the building would exceed 2.5 metres

The eaves of a building will be the point where the lowest point of a roof slope, or a flat roof, meets the outside wall of the building. The Guidance on Class A above includes examples and further guidance.

Under Class E the maximum height of the eaves on any part of the building (irrespective of total height) is 2.5 metres. For example, on a building with a single- pitched roof, the 2.5 metres eaves limit and three metres maximum height limit would be as shown below.

Maximum height of 3m

Maximum eaves height of 2.5ms

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f) the building, enclosure, pool or container would be situated within the curtilage of a listed building

An application for planning permission will be required for any building, enclosure, pool or container that would be situated on land surrounding a listed building.

(g) it would include the construction or provision of a veranda, balcony or raised platform

Verandas, balconies and raised platforms are not permitted development under Class E.

A raised platform is defined as any platform that has a height of more than 300 millimetres. Garden decking will therefore be permitted development under Class E subject to it not exceeding this 300mm height limit and subject to the other limits and conditions under this Class.

h) it relates to a dwelling or a microwave antenna

Class E covers buildings that are for a purpose incidental to a dwelling. Class E does not provide permitted development rights for works related to a house (eg extensions to a house) which are covered by other Classes of the rules on permitted development. Permitted development rights for microwave antenna are covered under Class H of the rules.

(i) the capacity of the container would exceed 3,500 litres.

A container with a capacity greater than 3,500 litres will not be permitted development and will require an application for planning permission.

E.2 In the case of any land within the curtilage of the dwellinghouse which is within –

  1. (a)  a World Heritage Site,
  2. (b)  a National Park, ,
  3. (c)  an area of outstanding natural beauty or
  4. (d)  the Broads,

development is not permitted by Class E if the total area of ground covered by buildings, enclosures, pools and containers situated more than 20 metres from any wall of the dwellinghouse would exceed 10 square metres

The effect of this limitation is to restrict the amount of permitted development for buildings, enclosures, pools and containers located more than 20 metres away from any wall of the house. The total area of ground which may be covered by buildings etc more than 20 metres from any wall of a house is 10 square metres.

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20m

Maximum total area of ground that can

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be covered by

enclosures, pools or containers in this unshaded area is 10 square metres

20m

E.3 In the case of any land within the curtilage of the dwellinghouse which is article 1(5) land, development is not permitted by Class E if any part of the building, enclosure, pool or container would be situated on land between a wall forming a side elevation of the dwellinghouse and the boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse

This additional restriction applies for land surrounding a house in National Parks, the Broads, areas of outstanding natural beauty, conservation areas, and within World Heritage Sites. In these areas, buildings, enclosures, pools or containers sited on land between a side wall and the boundary of the land surrounding the house are not permitted development:

Buildings, enclosures, pools or containers are not permitted development in these shaded areas of the land surrounding the house
Front of house

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buildings,

Interpretation of Class E

E.4 For the purposes of Class E, “purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse as such” includes the keeping of poultry, bees, pet animals, birds or other livestock for the domestic needs or personal enjoyment of the occupants of the dwellinghouse

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Other Classes Under Part 1

Class F

This provides permitted development rights within the area of land surrounding the house (“the curtilage”) for –

  1. (a)  the provision of a hard surface for any purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse as such or
  2. (b)  the replacement in whole or in part of such a surface

Conditions

F.1 Development is permitted by Class F subject to the condition that where –

  1. (a)  the hard surface would be situated on land between a wall forming the principal elevation of the dwellinghouse and a highway, and
  2. (b)  the area of ground covered by the hard surface, or the area of hard surface replaced, would exceed 5 square metres,

either the hard surface shall be made of porous materials, or provision shall be made to direct run-off water from the hard surface to a permeable or porous area or surface within the curtilage of the dwellinghouse

The Department for Communities and Local Government has produced separate guidance on permeable paving. This can be found at: avingfrontgardens.pdf

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Class G

This provides permitted development rights for the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe on a dwellinghouse.

G.1 Development is not permitted by Class G if –

  1. (a)  the height of the chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe would exceed the highest part of the roof by 1 metre or more or
  2. (b)  in the case of a dwellinghouse on article 1(5) land, the chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe would be installed on a wall or roof slope which-
    1. (i)  fronts a highway, and
    2. (ii)  forms either the principal elevation or a side elevation of the dwellinghouse.

The guidance on the rules under Class A provides advice on the terms “highest part of the roof”, “fronts a highway” and “principal” and “side elevations.

Class H

This provides permitted development rights for the installation, alteration or replacement of a microwave antenna, such as a satellite dish, on a dwellinghouse or within the curtilage of a dwellinghouse.

H.1 Development is not permitted by Class H if –

  1. (a)  it would result in the presence on the dwellinghouse or within its curtilage of-
    1. (i)  more than two antennas;
    2. (ii)  a single antenna exceeding 100 centimetres in length;
    3. (iii)  two antennas which do not meet the relevant size criteria;
    4. (iv)  an antenna installed on a chimney, where the length of the antenna would exceed 60 centimetres;
    5. (v)  an antenna installed on a chimney, where the antenna would protrude above the chimney; or
    6. (vi)  an antenna with a cubic capacity in excess of 35 litres
  2. (b)  in the case of an antenna to be installed on a roof without a chimney, the highest part of the antenna would be higher than the highest part of the roof

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(c) in the case of an antenna to be installed on a roof with a chimney, the highest part of the antenna would be higher than the highest part of the chimney, or 60 centimetres measured from the highest part of the ridge tiles of the roof, whichever is the lower or

(d) in the case of article 1(5) land, it would consist of the installation of an antenna –

  1. (i)  on a chimney, wall or roof slope which faces onto, and is visible from, a highway;
  2. (ii)  in the Broads, on a chimney, wall or roof slope which faces onto, and is visible from, a waterway; or
  3. (iii)  on a building which exceeds 15 metres in height

Conditions

H.2 Development is permitted by Class H subject to the following conditions –

  1. (a)  an antenna installed on a building shall, so far as practicable, be sited so as to minimise its effect on the external appearance of the building and
  2. (b)  an antenna no longer needed for reception or transmission purposes shall be removed as soon as reasonably practicable.

Interpretation of Class H

H.3 The relevant size criteria for the purposes of paragraph H.1(a)(iii) are that –

  1. (a)  only one of the antennas may exceed 60 centimetres in length and
  2. (b)  any antenna which exceeds 60 centimetres in length must not exceed 100 centimetres in length.

H.4 The length of the antenna is to be measured in any linear direction, and shall exclude any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting or brackets.

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Interpretation of Part 1

For the purposes of Part 1:

‘raised’ in relation to a platform means a platform with a height greater than 300 millimetres; and

‘terrace house’ means a dwellinghouse situated in a row of three or more dwellinghouses used or designed for use as single dwellings, where –

  1. (a)  it shares a party wall with, or has a main wall adjoining the main wall of, the dwellinghouse on either side or
  2. (b)  if it is at the end of a row, it shares a party wall with or has a main wall adjoining the main wall of a dwellinghouse which fulfils the requirements of sub-paragraph (a).

Delivery Times

shed deliveries

Arranging a Date and Time For Your New Garden Building.

Once you have placed your order either online or over the phone. We will need a few days to process that order. Please DO NOT contact us straight away as we need time to see if the building is in stock or if it needs to be made.

If it needs to be made we need to fit it into our manufacturing she-dual, now depending on if it is a bog standard small shed or a more complex summerhouse or workshop will vary the time it takes to produce.

When have to work out which areas we are going to on any selected day? We always try our best to accommodate you but it is not always possible to please everyone.

Do You Have Clear Access to the Site – Yes or NO ? –

Delivery Times are only ever given as a Very Approximate Guide and are given at that time considering the issues we may or may not have at that particular time. The actual delivery can be up to many hours difference due to many reasons nearly always 95% beyond our control 

We therefor cannot be held responsible for any losses that this may cause you. It is just a fact you have to accept when having large , heavy, bulky items delivered.

There may very well be cases where you building may NOT get delivered on the suggested day and this is simply something you have to accept due to the nature of our Business. Traffic! Brake Downs! Access issues ! Problems with Previous clients and much more

Large Bulky Items like Timber Buildings are not something DHL can just through in the back of a van and leave on your doorstep so please do not expect the same type of service .

If you are of such a temperament that you need to come on the phone screaming, shouting expecting us to perform tasks which we have no control over then you should arrange to collect the building your self or pay an extra fee for an individual delivery.

What we suggest is-

We suggest you call 0151 345 6649 the evening before your expected delivery date or on the morning of due delivery date and we can provide you with a phone number.

That way you will be dealing directly with the delivery team who can inform you of any delays they may have encountered during that day.

Trying to arrange delivery of any product is always a problem. Our products are not some small parcel you just ordered from Argos that the driver can throw into your porch or letterbox. The main thing is every single person nowadays thinks they are more important than the next person and everything should be dropped just for them no matter what size or price the building it is.

Unfortunately, in the real world business have to make money to pay the bills and the staff. The work with the most profit will always have priority and that’s the way it is. This does not mean that anyone is any more important than another, just the way it is in this day and age, simple economics and common sense must rule.

We are running a Business NOT a charity. The days are long gone when a customer was always right unfortunately nowadays it is not black or white we have grey as well! Employees have rights as well nowadays, the right not be abused and threatened by costumers ( on the increase  )

When you first order you’re Building we try our best and pre-arrange some sort of  Delivery Date. For` example we generally deliver to the Wirral Areas of Liverpool on a Friday so that has now become our delivery date for most Wirral Shed and Summer House Deliveries. It is not hard and fast but find it the most popular day generally. 

Times and Dates

Any Dates /Times given can only be taken as our Best estimate Only and can not be taken as guaranteed in any way what so ever. We can NOT Guarantee a delivery time unless you pay extra for a single bespoke delivery with prices starting at £100 this can be arranged to have an individual wagon bring your delivery.

We can only offer you only a Guest-amate and only ever a very rough guide. Not a Date we can ever be held to.

When we say guess / estimate we mean having taken all the factors we have to hand into account at that moment in time with things like

  • Traffic
  • Road Accident
  • Flat Tyre
  • Bad Weather
  • Bad access
  • Previous delivery / erecting issues causing delays
  • Previous clients not having a base ready or suitable for that size building

All the above are totally beyond our control, but WILL cause delays in deliveries

Problems with Clients

Now believe it or not nearly 80% of any problems that cause delays are implemented by You the Client ( not everyone of course ) Yes it is a simple fact that a lot of people now days are simply very inconsiderate and are only think about their own little world and sod anyone else who comes after.

We see this outside fast food places where there are bins yet people just throw rubbish out the windows. Simply Lazy and Inconsiderate.

Well, this very same selfishness is happening everywhere. It may not seem like much but the list of incidents below either singularly or as a group relay do cause long term knock-on effects for deliveries.

  • We get to the site and no one is in!
  • We get to site and the base is not set out correctly – Our Floor beams always run the longest Direction – Check Out our Base Page
  • We get to a site and get a note saying ( Just took kids to School – back in 45 mins ) It cost us money paying staff sat waiting who is paying for that time?
  • We turn up an cannot get the building in because you thought it would go through the House!
  • We get the building through to your back and NO BASE ready, We get met with comments like, (my fella will be back with some wood soon or he will sort it when he gets back – just wait )
  • Bad weather!
  • Just lift it over the Garage or Go down 5 houses and take it over the fences!
  • When we get to erect the Building the Base is NOT SOLID and LEVEL ( so we can not erect it )
  • Access to the site is covered in Dog Muck / Rubble / Rubbish / Overhanging Trees or the likes.
  • The shed has been set up and we are Told – The wife does not like it there move it to other side or you are not getting paid.
  • We have completed the building and waiting for payment ( COD Only jobs ) the customer goes missing and we have to wait to be paid.
  • Our Truck is blocked in by bad neighbours or simply dozy people who don’t realise a Truck need more space than a Car.

And the list goes on, I could spend all day listing some of the totally unreasonable requests we get from People nowadays, it would make a full time You Have Been Framed Show a lot of it is simply funny and you can only but laugh. But any or all of the above can cause delays to the next waiting client, which may be you!

Payments Made

The fact you may well have paid for your building does not give you the right to threaten or abuse our staff.

As with most sales/ purchases nowadays especial when using Credit / Debit Cards you will be expected to pay in full when placing the order.

So the fact your building has been delayed or in the odd case not delivered on the day we suggested does not mean we are in breach of any contract. If a delivery problem has occurred it will be rearranged in a timely manner.

We can NOT and Will NOT be dictated to as and when a redelivery date can be arranged, as many other people may have been affected by the issue that caused your delay. So all these individual factors need taking into account. No one client is any more important than an other client and we will make the call as to what is the best course of action as we know all the facts – You DO NOT !

Increase in Bad Attitudes

For some reason, we are finding a certain section of people increasingly become aggressive and very bad mannered especially over the phone. We feel a lot of this now days is down to excessive

Drinking and or Illegal Substances, but what we do know is certain peoples bad attitudes are on the increase and becoming more demanding to the existent there has been a few TV programs about it.

Recently in our Office and out on site some of our staff have been subjected to threats of violence in relation to buildings not being delivered on time. We are simply NOT prepared to tolerate this sort of behaviour and will immediately cancel any order if any member of staff receives threats of any nature.

If you live in our FREE area then you are NOT actually paying for this service it is totally FREE .

We do try our best but for some it is never enough.

Unfortunately, this is No Longer a Joke and is becoming an ever increasing problem in society generally as we are all aware of.

We are NOT here to be abused and will put the phone down on anyone who raises their voice or becomes aggressive in any way. Talk to us the way you would like to be spoken to your self.

It is that simple and for the small amount of money to be made selling a shed the abuse is not worth the effort some times!

You will approach us in the same manner that you would like to be approached, yes we are aware it may well be very frustrating not having you’re building delivered, but it has happened and you must simply accept it. By screaming, shouting or the likes will not change it. We can NOT control outside forces – no one can, it is that simple. You can always come and pick the building up your self – We do not charge for delivery or erecting locally anyway, so it would suit us!

We have people Demanding compensation and telling us what else you could have been doing that day again will not change anything. It has happened for a reason and again 95% of the time, beyond our control and you will simply have to take a deep breath and accept it. It is not like we are making fortunes out of Garden Sheds it is so competitive a lot of the time we are lucky to cover our costs. So will not put up with any Abuse from anyone.

Problems Will Happen

On the occasion that delays are caused, it is simply going to be a case of putting up with it, as we have explained above due to it being beyond our control 90% of the time.

There is NO point getting on the phone trying to tell us you have taken time off work or how much money you are losing. We can do Nothing to change the fact over the phone repeating what we already know. Frustrating yes but it has happened and nothing any human being can do about it. Screaming and shouting down the phone will NOT change anything.

All our calls are recorded for security reasons. Our staff are NOT here to be abused by anyone no matter how big you think the problem is, if the staff feel you are being abusive or threatening they will put the phone down and only deal with you via email when you have clammed down / sobered up or come down of whatever has caused you to get in that abusive state . Unfortunataly this aggressive manner is becoming ever increasing in life generally .

The days are long gone of the customer is always right.Now days it is a compromise we have rights to be treated with an amount of respect and the fact you have bought a shed does not give you the right to abuse our staff in any way no matter how much you think you have paid.

When we give an approx. Delivery time it is given in good faith and must NOT be held as a SET TIME – we CAN NOT give exact times, it is only an educated Guess based upon the conditions at the time when it was given, so if those conditions change so will the delivery Times  and there is very little anyone can do about it .

We can NOT be held responsible for any Time you may have taken from work or another project.

We can NOT be held accountable for any Loss of Money due to delays in other work you may be carrying out that itself is delayed due to our service.

We can NOT be held responsible for any form of loss be it financial or otherwise due to our late or none delivery.

If we arrive on site and your base is NOT suitable then you will have to re she dual a new delivery day. The drivers can not arrange this. It may take a good week or so even longer at busy times 

It is a simple fact that our items are large and bulky and take time to deliver , they are not small parcels from that can just be left in the porch!

If you feel our basic delivery service will not meet your requirements for a Minimum extra £100 we can send your delivery out at a set date and time to suit both parties.

You are always welcome to come and collect your own building direct from the factory if this suites you.

Our Payment Terms 

Product Specifactions ​​

timber specs

Size & Specifications

All sizes quoted on this web site for the building are based upon approximate Roof sizes and NOT Floor sizes 

If you are in doubt in any way do NOT order your building or lay a base until you have checked out these dimensions.

Timber Sizes

Cladding

All timber sizes are quote is only ever approximate and can vary by a few millilmetres , some of this is due to the fact timber swells and contracts as part of its natural process. Other reasons are the way the Timber industry has historically sold timber.

It is quite legal to sell say a piece of T+G at say 16 x 125mm. This means it is 16mm Thick and 125 mm wide. BUT this is Nominal and before matchining so that finished size could be any thing from 11mm to 13mm x 120mm to 122mm .

Same with any timber size – our 22mm is sold to us at  26 x 125 so we could legally advertise it at 26mm thick cladding when in fact in real life it will be anything from 24mm to 20mm. We have no way of telling as the main saw mills are in Norway / Sweden , it is not until it arrives at our door do we actually know the finished sizes.

So to make things a simple as possible we always try to show our prices at the nearest size AFTER it has been machined – ie 12mm ( may be 11 or 13mm ) and same with all other thicknesses, so please expect variations of a few millimeter either way .

If this is not acceptable to you and you want a very specific size or thickness, this is possible but at a premium. You will need to inform us via email at the time of order otherwise it will be taken for granted you are happy with our prices and sizes provided as standard.

DO NOT Place an order on our site otherwise with our agents if you can not accept these Timber industry facts. We do not make wood we only buy it in and assemble it

The Framing

We have a selection of framing thickness depending on the product your purchase.

Apart from the odd budget shed we occasionally offer all our framework will be 2 x 2 ( 50 x 50mm ) or 3 x 2 ( 75 x 50mm ) for workshops and heavy duty sheds

If you look at the main category section and not just the product itself it will usually have a more detailed spec within that page.

Our standard Apex Sheds all come with. 

  1. 50 x 50mm framing –
  2. The sides ( eves) are 69 inch tall ( 14 standard T+G boards high ) this is one board taller than most of our competitors.

The hight at the top of the apex will change depending on the width of the apex section, the narrower the building the lower that apex will be, but on the widest section it will never be any more than permitted planning height which is 2.5m. because of the angle ( 15 % ) this max heigh will drastically reduce on the smaller narrow sheds under 6ft wide.

If you are looking for lots of headroom then you will need to buy a wider apex shed or invest more money and purchase a heavy duty shed or workshop

Our Heavy Duty Sheds all come with .

  1. 75 x 50mm framing
  2. The sides ( eves) 76 inch tall  ( 17 standard T+G boards hight ) This extra heigh enables the door to be positioned anywhere around the building.

Virtually no internal hight isues with these building a 6ft 3in pearson can easily walk any where in these buildings once inside.

Once again because the roof angle ( 15 degrees)  the hight at the center will change depending on the width of Apex but with buildings up to 12ft wide they will comply with local planning regs 

Floors / Roofs On Garden Buildings

We only use Solid T+G on all our floors and roofs on our whole range of timber garden buildings. We DO NOT use chipboard or lowgrade OSB.

The floor T+G timbers will usually be the same thickness as the cladding apart from our Workshop range where no matter what thickness cladding the floors are always 22mm*. This is because of the size and weight become simply far to heavy to handle.

A 12mm Shed will have a 12mm Thick Floor 

A 22mm Shed / Workshop  will have a 22mm Thick Floor 

A 28mm Shed / Workshop  will have a 22mm Thick Floor 

Our Floor Bearers will ALWAYS run the length of the building – The longest way UNLESS you request otherwise in writing via email. We will NOT accept requests for changes via phone as there will be no evidence of that request in the case of dispute on these matters.

Increasingly we are getting to site to erect a building where the client starts taking advise from the neighbor / friends /family on the best way to do things. They were told to put floor beares down this or that way. Without them having any idea and certainly without consulting us.

Important Note

It is vital you have a solid and level base, NOT sloping in any direction for you to take advantage of our FREE erecting service. If we get to site and you base is not suitable solid and level we reserve the right to drop of the building and will require full payment of any outstanding monies.

We can offer you a call back service to erect that building. This call back fee will be a minimum of £50 depending on where you are if you are any more than 20 Miles we will need to talk abouta price for this service.

If the base you have provided requires extra timbers or support, this will all be at an extra charge depending on the materials involved. We do not carry these extra timbers with us so it may well involve you paying not only for the extra timber but our call back service fees as well.

Having two staff sat in a truck traveling to you with the cost of / fuel and expenses are NOT cheap nowadays. We can not be expected to cover these costs our selves if it was you the client who has caused the problem.

As you were NOT charged for the erecting service in the first place, it causes us great expense and inconvenience having to return to a job because of a situation you the client has caused by not seeking or using our advice provided via our web site or over the phone. A 5 min call or quick email is all it takes.

Roofing Felt

We only use new industry approved tarbased roofing felt, but as with any product it is available in different grades.

Roofing felt is supplied and sold by weight and length.

Most popular is the standard 20KG  10m or 20m rolls this basic felt is used on all our standard apex and pent roof sheds and is overlapped and fixed using galvinised staples.

Next we have our heavy duty 40KG again in 10m or 20m rolls, this is as it looks double the thickness compared to the basic felt so obviously a much longer lasting product . This 20KG felt is used on all our heavy duty sheds and garden wokshops as standard

Timber Issues

timber issues

Timber is a Natural Product

 As most people will know Timber / Wood is a Naturally occurring product and as such prone to all or any of the process below . If you were not aware the information below may assist in educating you to these facts.

All Softwood Timbers are prone to or likely to suffer from the following factors no matter who you purchase your building from.

  • Warping 
  • Shrinking 
  • Splitting 
  • Twisting
  • Shakes 
  • Knot Holes 

None of which we as a manufacture can control as it is a natural occurring process and beyond any human intervention without the timber undergoing expensive processes such as Laminating which will drastically increase the cost .

Although we always endeavour to select the best timbers during manufacturing the fast-growing nature of the Timbers / Wood nowadays these issues are inherent.

Where ever possible we will always offer FREE advise and guidance on how to deal with any issues listed above but generally just use a bit of commonence. Most small common issues are known holes and small splits, these can be dealt with by using a quality wood filler available in most major DIY stores .

A Timber Product can NOT be guaranteed against Naturaly occurring events .  

If you feel you can not accept these facts we suggest you DO NOT buy a Softwood timber based product from us or any supplier and opt for a manmade product such as Plastic or Metal which can be fully controlled during its process.

As we only buy in our Timber cut and nail it on to the framework, we do not do any machining, planning or processing in any form. Our Timber is purchased from a Timber merchant who in turn buys it from a Saw Mill in the Baltics so we have a chain of custody but none of this changes the fact because of its inherent nature timber will do what nature allows it to do. 

Therefor because of the reasons stated above will not carry our any Guarantee / Warranty Repair or replacement due to Naturally occuring material issues.

This note is esspecaily important to highly strung occurring of children who purchase a timber playhouse. It will be your ( the parents ) responsibility to ensure the buildings is safe for your child to use as per our T+Cs,  splinters and so on are like to aeries in the construction of such buildings even after all reasonable action has been taken by our selves.

Steps To Building a Garden Workshop

shed erecting

Timber workshops

Have a number of uses. These are not only storage sheds for your tools and other equipment that you use for gardening and your other hobbies; they can also double as workstations where you do your projects.

Thus, it is important that you have a list of steps to follow when you build your shed otherwise, you might end up with a structure that is not to your liking. Here are the steps for building a shed:

Know what you want. This is an important step often overlooked by a lot of people. Don’t make the same mistake; if you do, your shed will likely not meet all your needs. Determining the uses of the shed you will build will help you come up with the right size and design.

Once you’ve made a mental note of the reasons you have for constructing] a shed, the next thing you should do is consider its location.

Take note of the shed’s location. There are several things you need to [consider | look into] here. First, if you already have a location in mind, take note of its measurements so that you won’t make the mistake of building a shed that’s too big that it will encroach other properties or force you to make modifications to the structure, or too small that the available space is wasted.

If you don’t have a location in mind, though, you should know the factors to consider when determining where you should build your shed. Strong workshops are built on level ground for stability and in an open space where enough sunlight and air can enter. After deciding where to build your shed, the next step is to come up with a design or a plan that will serve as a guide when you start your project.

  • Make the blueprint for your shed. The best timber workshops are a  result of careful planning. That said, consider your needs and the shed’s location when drawing a blueprint for your project. If you want to [have | include] a greenhouse and a potting station in your workshop, for instance, make sure that your design allows space for these.
  • With regard to the greenhouse, take note of the location of your shed and decide where best to place it; the area that receives copious amounts of sunlight is preferable.
  • It is also in this step that you should determine the proper position of doors, windows, and lighting and plumbing fixtures (if applicable) in the structure.
  • Purchase materials. Once you have a plan, you can now make a list of the materials you need. A good tip here is to write the average price for every material in your list, and then add these up so that you have an idea of how much you need. Don’t worry too much about [expense | cost], though: timber workshops are often less expensive compared to ones made of metal and concrete. 
  • Once you have all your materials, you can start building your project.

Things To Consider

log cabins in factory

Things to Consider Prior to Building a Garden Shed

Regardless of why you want to develop a shed, there are numerous things you will want to take into factor to consider. Here are six things to take into factor to consider prior to constructing a garden shed.

1. Why?

The first thing you wish to think about is why you wish to construct a shed. Identifying the reason for the shed can help you select exactly how big it should be, where you wish to put it, and exactly what design you wish to choose. Understanding why you desire and need a shed could help prepare you to construct precisely what you had wished for.

2. The amount of area?

Certainly, you have to take into factor to consider exactly how much space you have offered to develop your shed. You probably do not desire your whole lawn to be a shed.

3. Where to put it?

Look at where you desire the dropped to go as soon as you have actually figured out exactly how much space you have to work with. You probably desire to put the shed as close to the yard as feasible if you have a yard and desire to make use of the shed for gardening and storing gardening supplies. Think about how you are visiting utilize the garden shed and where it will be most practical according to exactly how it will be used.

4. Style

There are a number of designs to pick from when it comes to developing a shed. There are solitary doors, double doors, sheds with patios, sheds made out of wood, brick, and numerous more. Sometimes it is most effectively to try and build a dropped that comes as close to matching your home as possible.

5. Do you want to develop it?

Plus, you want to make sure the shed gets developed effectively. Otherwise, you will have a garden shed that falls apart far sooner than you would such as.

6. Cash

As with everything in this world, cash is a matter you have to look at. If you are on a tight budget plan, there is no sense in looking at constructing a substantial and large sheds and workshops.

Building garden sheds can be a stimulating job. After reviewing this short article you will gain a better understanding of what you need to understand prior to constructing a shed.

Regardless of why you want to build a shed, there are several things you will desire to take into factor to consider. The first thing you desire to consider is why you desire to build a dropped. Figuring out the reason for the shed could help you decide on exactly how huge it requires to be, where you desire to put it, and what style you want to pick.

If you have a yard and desire to use the dropped for gardening and saving gardening materials, you probably want to place the shed as close to the garden as feasible.

There are single doors, double doors, sheds with porches, sheds made out of wood, brick, and numerous more.

Check our Images Page

Back Yard Sheds

Back Yard Sheds

Can be a terrific storage solution; but an unorganised back yard storage shed can be even worse than nothing at all. One method to prevent that shed in the yard from becoming a rats’ nest is to personalize your shed to integrate organizational solutions which make it simple to discover a place for everything.

Shelves, pegboards, cabinets and hooks could make the best use of your backyard dropped and make it easy to get and remain arranged.
Plan Ahead– Go out to your yard shed with some graph paper, a tape measure and a pen or pencil and strategy out where to put all of the pegboards, hooks, cabinets and other organizational aspects.

This is something you would ideally do prior to constructing your back lawn shed, however if it’s already there, there’s no time like the present to come up with a plan. Do not forget to leave enough space to make it easy to reach every little thing and if feasible, for workspace in your yard shed.

Install a Workbench– If you have enough space, a workbench is an excellent addition to your yard shed. Select a workbench which includes drawers; a dropped is a fairly little area, so every little thing you could do to make use of the readily available area helps.

Categorize– You’ll have a much easier time discovering everything in your back yard shed when you keep them separated by kind. Use identified bins and boxes which can be closed firmly. Team comparable items with each other; but remember that you shouldn’t save anything which is sensitive to temperature extremes in your yard shed.

Protection – You should install locks in your backyard shed. You’ll wish to have the ability to lock the door of course, but you might wish to think about locking your cabinets too to prevent fraud in addition to keeping possibly dangerous products away from animals and small children.

Up and Away– If your backyard shed has a high ceiling, use this space by building a mini loft space or setting up incorporates the ceiling. This lets you keep less generally used products out of the way as you work or retrieve tools from your backyard shed.

Things you make use of just rarely can be tucked away in less easily reached parts of your yard shed. If you need to stack anything, keep in mind to keep the most generally utilized products at the top of the stack.

One last backyard shed company pointer: If you’ll be keeping lawnmowers, bigger barbecue grills or other items with wheels in your backyard dropped, you could wish to utilize a ramp instead of an action at the entrance of your shed.

With some sound judgment, cautious planning and a few add-ons, you could quickly turn your yard shed into a well arranged location and save yourself numerous hours of disappointment over the long term. You’ll stay organized when you make it simple to be arranged.

A yard shed could be a terrific storage space option; but an unorganized back lawn storage space dropped can be even worse than nothing at all. One means to prevent that shed in the backyard from becoming a rats’ nest is to customize your shed to integrate business solutions which make it simple to discover a location for everything. Shelves, pegboards, cabinets and hooks can make the best use of your backyard dropped and make it simple to get and stay organized.
Don’t forget to leave enough space to make it simple to reach everything and if possible, for work space in your yard shed. Things you utilize only hardly ever could be tucked away in less quickly reached parts of your yard shed.

Pressure Treated Sheds

Pressure Garden Workshops / Sheds

Tanalised / Pressure Impregnated Timbers

Pressure Treated Sheds one thing that many people can agree on is the fact that buying a shed is not a simple job now days . It is important that you weigh all of your options and make a purchase that you will not regret later.

Our selection of Tanalised sheds at City Centre Sheds may be exactly what you need, but you may not know for sure until you read the information below.

Most important fact most suppliers will not tell is you WILL still need to treat the building to make it waterproof .

A Tanalised building is NOT WATERPROOF!

The first thing I should do is explain to you exactly what tanalised sheds are. These are structures that are made of wood that has been treated under pressure .

This is when chemicals are forced into the wood to protect it and preserve it for many years to come. The wood is placed into a cylinder and vacuum pressure is applied to force the preservatives into it.

This will protect it from things like insects ,fungal and general decay. But not bad weather entering it !

Very import note nearly every supplier of tanalised sheds forget to inform you of this fact  – They are NOT water proof at this stage .

The treatment is for decay protection and NOT weather proofing .

It WILL require a good coat of spirit based water repellant to stop water getting in. 

When you buy a tanalised shed from City Centre Sheds, it will deliver and erect it free within 30 miles of Liverpool , out side this area there will be an additional delivery charge.

One reason people buy tanalised sheds is to reduce the amount of effort they have to put into maintenance, having someone else put it together for you is an added bonus.

This means that from the minute the tanalised shed is erected in your backyard, there will be minimal work or maintenance that you have to do.

Different Quality Tanalised Sheds

There is also a major difference in the way and the amount of time the timbers are pressure treated. Now days we see so many discounted pressure treated buildings on line , that effectively have on had a cats lick ( if that ) in the pressure chamber .

Time is money as we all know , so by cutting corners and allowing timber to stay in treatment chamber for only a few mines will massively save money .

But by law – yes it has been pressure treated . But not properly ! You work it out !

The type you choose should depend on what you plan to use your tanalised shed for.

If you are looking to use it strictly for storage them the apex or pent roof shed would work just fine, but if you would like to use it as your own personal work space, you should consider getting one of our heavy duty tanalised garden workshops.

There are many companies out there that offer pre-built tanalised sheds and at first looks appear to be a bit cheaper than what is offered at City Centre Sheds.

Do not allow price and convenience to be the thing that sways you into making the wrong decision. Since not all sheds and certainly tanalised sheds are built in the same way.

As was discussed earlier in this article, it is a great idea to get a tanalised shed because they can go a long time with minimum maintenance.

In fact, you can have them for 15-20 years before you will have to repair or replace them. Can you imagine not having to worry about your structure for such a long time?

Meaning that you will be able to focus on more important things like what to put in your shed and what you can do to keep your yard well-maintained.

But there is an alternative ! By simply buying the normal shed or workshop and ensuring it is raised of the ground to allow air to ventilate and keep it dry . Once it has had a few coats of a quality spirit based treatment it will effectively last just as long if not longer.

There has long been a fallacy that having a shed pressure treated is the best choice when in fact the pressure treating system was designed for fencing post and panels that do not required to be kept dry ? Have you ever been told that before ?

You will find a lot of tanalised shed suppliers who line the insides of their buildings with a bitumen building paper .

This is usually to hide the fact that unless fully dried the timber is likely to spit and move much more than that of a normal shed due to the vast amount of moisture impregnated into that timber during the treating process.

If you are still not convinced that you should get a tanalised shed from City Centre Sheds, maybe you should read this again. There are many pros and cons  to this type of shed.

Even if you decide that you would like another type of shed, you should still make it a point to buy it from City Centre Sheds.

Low Quality Tanalised Sheds

With the growth of the internet we are now finding a lot of adverts for so called cheap tanalised sheds appearing on sites like Ebay. They do appear much cheaper so we ended up buy one to see how it was made up.

When we had it analysed it worked out that they where using not only seconds grade timber but the timber itself was not being correctly tanalised.

Ending up with a  very pale light green , blotchy effect all over the building.

 

 

Small Sheds

Small Sheds

Sheds To Fit Small Spaces

We get lots of inquiries for small sheds every week.

We will shortly be offering a range of basic sizes less than a 4×4 which is presently our smallest shed.

Small Shed Issues

The biggest issue we have is explaining to clients who much space is actually available inside a small shed

As we use 2×2 ( 50x50mm ) Framing and min  1/2 inch (12mm ) cladding automatically you will lose around 125mm or 5 inches.

Then you need to consider the roof overhang of at least 50mm ( 2inch )

We are now up to 7 inches ( 175mm )

So with this in mind, if you only wanted a 3ft wide shed  ( 1000mm ) you will only have 29inch ( 825mm)

Only just about sufficient space for a brush and spade!

Keep an eye on this page for future updates and pricing once we go into production.

50 Sheds Of Grey

50 Sheds Not Shades of Grey

A lighter Shed of Grey

We slipped on the veranda, turned cartwheels ‘cross the lawn, I was feeling kind of beer sick, but I still crawled out for more. The shed was spinning faster, and my date began to sway. When I offered her another drink, she fainted clean away.
And so it was later, that Camilla viewed the scene. And her face at first just yellow, turned a lighter shade of green. She said ‘This shed looks frightful,’ And  the truth was plain to tell, in my haste I’d made my out-house, A psychedelic hell. Over sixteen fretful virgins had left without their coats, and although my door was open, it might just as well have been closed.
And so it was later, that the painter had his way, and my shed at first just ghastly turned a lighter shade of grey . . .

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Sadly, the change of colour didn’t prove any more successful. In despair, I turned to poetry but that didn’t work either  . . .

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‘Shall I compare thee to a summerhouse? Thou art more homely and more intimate. Rough women do shake my darling shed of grey, but summarily spurn a second date.’

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However, after many years spent alone with nothing but my poetry and the swimsuit edition of Sheds Illustrated to keep me company, my luck finally changed. Brenda was everything those girls weren’t – easily pleased. Our eyes had met across a crowded garden centre. The very next day I took her home to meet my shed and I knew instantly from her reaction (she didn’t run away, screaming) that she was the one. We were married just three weeks later (it was quite a short guest list as it was only a small shed) and spent an idyllic honeymoon basking in the Caribbean sun . . .

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We stood alone on the idyllic white beach. She shed her clothes. I shed my inhibitions. At that moment I knew it would always be about sheds.

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. . . A gentle tapping jolts me from my sun-kissed reverie. I glance at my office door and straighten my back, ready to greet my mystery visitor. ‘Come in,’ I repeat, a little deeper and even more gravelly. Still the door doesn’t move. I’m bracing myself for my very deepest and most gravelly voice ever when I notice a pigeon sitting on the window ledge. He cocks his head quizzically at me then taps the glass with his tiny beak.

I smile at him and give him a wink, then frown at my 96-diamond platinum Rolex. Where has this woman got to? It must be a quarter of an hour since the call. ‘Hello . . . Olivia? Did you send that woman up? She hasn’t arrived yet.’ The voice on the line answers in the affirmative. ‘Strange . . . ‘ I reply, ‘Oh well, could you reschedule my three o’clock?

Thank you. Oh, and can you call the exterminators? The pigeons are back.’ I stroke my chin. Maybe she’s changed her mind. I should get back to work – I don’t want to waste the whole afternoon waiting for somebody not to come. I look at my computer screen and place my long, sturdy fingers on the keyboard but somehow my eyes are drawn back to the photographs on the wall and one in particular. Our first shed together . . .

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We arrived at our new home, tired but happy. Being a romantic and a traditionalist, I insisted on sweeping her up in my arms and carrying her across the threshold. ‘Ouch!’ she cried as her head hit the shed roof. I agreed to move the new shed to the back garden to avoid a repeat. And so our married life, with all its ups and downs, began . . .

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We tried various positions – round the back, on the side, up against a wall . . . but in the end we came to the conclusion that the bottom of the garden was only place for a really good shed.

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She knelt before me on the shed floor and tugged gently at first, then harder until finally it cam. I moaned with pleasure. Now for the other boot . . .

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I stared down at her, my hands on my hips. She’d been on her hands and knees for well over an hour. Finally I spoke . . . ‘Are you sure you lost your contact lens in here?’

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‘Harder,’ she cried gripping the workbench tightly, ‘Harder!’ ‘Alright,’ I said. ‘What’s the gross national product of Nicaragua?’

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My body writhed and quivered from the pain. I had learned my next lesson. Never again would I leave an upturned plug on the shed floor.

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‘Are you sure you want this?’ I asked. ‘When I’m done you won’t be able to sit down for weeks.’ She nodded. ‘Okay,’ I said, putting the three-piece suite on eBay.

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I was excited, but nervous. I’d been accepted into the BDSM community – Builders, Decorators and Shed Maintenance.

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As I stared out at the army of strange creatures standing to attention on the lawn, I realized I’d mixed up the slug pellets and the Viagra.

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I smile to myself, taking another sip of water. Married life was so happy and simple – a beautiful shed. But then one day, without warning, everything changed . . .

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The soft, rhythmic motion rocked me gently as I headed home that day, blissfully unaware of what lay in wait. I looked blearily around the train carriage at my fellow commuters, the men nose-deep in their broadsheets, the women staring wide-eyed and rosy-cheeked at their paperbacks. I wondered what type or literature could be evoking such a flushed response. On closer inspection I was surprised to see that all of their books bore the same cover – a silver knotted tie on a dark background. My brow furrowed. Were today’s women really so fascinated by male formal attire?

I was clearly out of touch – perhaps I should ask my own dear Brenda. However, when I arrived home I was surprised to find a letter waiting for me on the dining table: ‘Your dinner’s in the supermarket.’ I called her name but there was no reply.

I searched every room until finally I found her, lying in the bath, surrounded by scented candles, reading THAT book. From that moment things would never be the same again . . .

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‘Punish me,’ she cried desperately, ‘Make me suffer like only a real man can!’ ‘Very well,’ I replied, leaving the toilet seat up.

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She told me it turned her on to have her movements restricted when she made love. I looked around – I was going to have to get a smaller shed.

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‘Are you sure you can take the pain?’ she demanded, brandishing her stilettos. ‘I think so,’ I gulped. ‘Here we go, then,’ she said, and showed me the receipt.

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‘Pleasure and pain can be experienced simultaneously,’ she said, gently massaging my back as we listened to her Coldplay CD.

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‘Now,’ she said, fiercely, ‘I’m going to take you by the collar and lead you naked round the garden.’ I was shocked – the poor vicar had only popped round for a cup of tea.

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My whole body shuddered as she entered my Man Cave. I really must get a padlock for the shed door.

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‘Hurt me,’ she begged, raising her skirt as she bent over my workbench. ‘Very well,’ I replied, ‘You’ve got fat ankles and no dress sense.’

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Ever since she read THAT book, I’ve had to buy all kinds of ropes, chains and shackles. She still manages to get into the shed though.

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‘Happy birthday,’ she said, placing a riding crop in my hand and lowering her skirt, ‘Today’s your lucky day’. I couldn’t believe it – I was getting a pony!

—————————————————————————————————————————————–I froze when I saw the room full of masks, saddles and oddly-shaped battery-powered devices. That was it – no more drunk-ebaying for me.

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She gazed up at me wide-eyed from the shed floor and bit her lip seductively. Unfortunately it was her top lip so she looked like a piranha.

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By the time I’d finished, her bottom was bright pink – I’d mixed up the baby oil and the Thousand Island dressing again.

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I’m a very naughty girl,’ she said, biting her lip, ‘I need to be punished.’ So I invited my mother to stay for the weekend.

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‘I am your master,’ I commanded, ‘You will obey my rules,’ She rolled her eyes and walked out of the shed. That was definitely it – I needed to get a new cat.

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As we stood there naked in Ikea, we came to an important decision. Next time only one of us would wear a blindfold.

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‘Make me feel pain like I’ve never felt before,’ she pleaded, blindfolded and naked. ‘Alright,’ I said, placing the Lego bricks on the shed floor . . .

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‘Yes, mistress,’ I replied. I didn’t dare argue as I bent over the workbench – I could see she had a strop on. At least, I think that’s what they’re called.

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I told her exactly what she should do in my sternest and most dominant voice and awaited her response. Finally it came. ‘Please hold the line. Your call is very important to us . . .’

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As we were discharged from the casualty department for the third time that month, we began to wonder whether we should change the safe word from Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

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We each dropped our keys into the bowl. Before long we’d be entering a world of forbidden delights. God, I loved those shed-swapping parties.

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So this was it – it was really going to happen. Every man’s ultimate fantasy . . . Three In A Shed

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I managed to stay calm as my wife expertly bound my wrists and ankles. Although I have to admit I did get a little nervous when she bundled me into the boot of the car . . .

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‘You’re obsessed!’ she cried, slamming the door as she stormed out, ‘You love this shed more than me!’ I frowned. Obsessed? Me? Ridiculous! Shed be back. I mean, she’d be back . . .

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But she wasn’t. Brenda never returned and once more I was alone. I retreated into my shed. I sought solace in my garden and the World Wide Web. I tried dating and social networking sites, soon becoming quite proficient at the lingo. It didn’t take me long to figure out the acronyms (PMSL – Painting My Shed Lovingly, LMAO – Lawn Mowers Are Ok) but for some reason, none of these sites yielded a companion.

I gave up and found myself drawn to the darker corners of the internet and immersed myself in a twilight world of garden-based erotica, tawdry one-night sheds and online movies such as Last Tango in Homebase, The Red Shed Diaries and 91/2 Weeds . . . I started around the shed Brenda and I modified, and sighed. I stroked the leather studded workbench sadly. And then suddenly it came to me . . .

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I stare at the photograph in the very centre of the group. Our shed. The one I eventually agreed to convert into our ‘playroom’. The one that sat empty for years until the day I inexplicably found myself opening its door again, looked around at the chains hanging sadly from the walls, stroked the leather studded workbench and . . . had an idea. Not just an idea. The idea. The idea that was to make my name. The idea that gave me this vast, sprawling desk in this vast, sprawling office and three quarters of this vast, sprawling metropolis. I walk slowly over to the door and open it to look at the brass plate affixed to the other side.
‘Colin T. Grey, CEO, Slea-Z-Sheds International’. I brush the gleaming brass with the cuff of my Armani suit and my face breaks into a proud and slightly sad smile.
‘Hello.’
I swivel round then immediately freeze, my heart pounding. I can’t believe what I’m seeing. After all this time. After all those sheds. Finally my open mouth begins to form words.
‘What . . are you. . doing here?’
‘Ssssshh . . ‘ she whispers, placing her finger over my lips.
‘But . . . It’s been so long,’
‘I know,’ she says softly, ‘the elevator was broken.’
‘No, I mean . . . ‘
‘I wanted to wait . . . until the time was right.’ She reaches into her purse and draws out a blindfold. ‘Come with me,’ she says raising it to my eyes.
I roll my eyes and bite my lip. Just when I thought I had finally reached a lighter shade of Grey, I can see that, once again, things are about to get darker . . .

Timber Fencing

fencing Liverpool

F

GARDEN FENCING SUPPLIED AND FITTED LIVERPOOL – WIRRAL – SOUTHPORT

Here at City Centre Sheds in Liverpool we can provide you with a selection of Self Employed Contractors who can offer you a complete supply and Fix Price for a range of Timber Fencing Panels, with either Timber or Concrete Post and Base Panels.

As with any product you buy nowadays price is always a concern.

They are not into the low grade, cut corners type of products some suppliers are using to make out you are getting a better deal and will only supply good strong durable Timber Fencing Panels from their own sources.

Fencing supplied and fitted in Liverpool

Yes, there always will be someone capable of doing a job cheaper – or so it may seem! but it is not until you get the next strong set of wind and gales will you find out they may have not set the post in the ground deep enough. This and many, many other tricks are used by some of the cowboys you will come up against nowadays.

At the end of the day, it is your hard earned money we are talking of here. If you can afford just to throw it away then more fool you.

Choices

There are a number of basic things you need to consider for your new Fence

  • Overall Heights
  • Concrete or Timber Post
  • Concrete or Timber Base Panel
  • Flat or Arched Panels
  • Single Side or Duble SIded Fencing Panels

The biggest problem that is encountered on site when erecting Fencing is Dualing Between Nabours. Who pays for what!

If you both go half who gets the good side of the panels is not going for double sides fencing panels?

We have seen it come to feisty cuffs on some occasions over this sort of thing and it can get very nasty, so we recommend you talk with your Nabours and get something in writing from the start so you both know where you stand. As we all know our House in our Castle and people will defend their Ground!

The normal procedure will be for a quick site survey by the lads who will photo and video the area encase of any disputes later, once they have provided you with a Quote you will be required to pay a 75% deposit and the balance payable on completion usually. They will not get involved in disputes about getting next doors half of the payment ?

They will only deal with the person who made the enquiry and will expect payment from that person alone . It will be up to you the individual parties to sort out your differences and not us. We are sorry to have to bring this up but it is becoming an increasing problem nowadays.

Other Garden Services 

The Fence Erecting Lads also offer a wide range of other Garden Services including …

  • Timber Decking
  • Gates
  • Turfing
  • Landscaping
  • Shed Bases
  • Removal of Old Garden Buildings
  • General Construction Work

Please send your enquiry and we will pass it on to the Contractors concerned.

Fencing Articles

Installing Garden Fencing
When planting a garden, it is wise to consider some type of garden fencing for various reasons. Some people may think that keeping an open garden without fencing will look more attractive, and they may be correct, but there are some definite reasons for having a fence around some areas of your garden, if not completely around it.
If you are growing vegetables such as carrots, lettuce, tomatoes and such, once the plants begin to mature, the vegetables will attract critters, and if you want anything left for you to eat, it is wise to place a barrier between your garden and the animals. Garden fences can come in a wire configuration, which is easy to install around the perimeter of your garden. Inexpensive metal posts can serve as anchors, and the wire mesh can be placed around the garden very attractively in this manner. It is also easy to install a gate for easy entrance and exit.
In recent years, the vinyl fence has become popular, due to its strong construction aspect and the fact that it will last a long time. It requires no maintenance and is very strong in protecting the garden from any pest or animal that may have its designs on your vegetables. The vinyl fences are treated with a coating that will withstand the longstanding effect that the sun can have on things.
The vinyl fencing comes in all kinds of styles and varieties to give you a wide choice of the kind of look you will want. They come in all sizes, from semi-private, lattice fences, and picket fencing. The popularity stems from the ability to get fencing that will complement the rest of the landscaping of the property as a whole.
If you have deer in the area in which you live, there is special fencing that can be erected in order to keep them out, so your entire crop doesnít evaporate in one nighttime feeding.
Smaller fencing can be used to cordon off different sections of your garden, simply to give an orderly division between plants. These fences typically are of low height and can be made of any material that is attractive and will suit your taste.
Wooden fencing adds a distinctive style to any garden fencing arrangement, and it can be purchased at nearly every garden and outdoor store. The wood is usually treated at the factory against rotting and damage by pests. This will ensure its longevity and lasting qualities. Wooden fencing is a very attractive way to accent the garden and give a stylish look that can blend well with the rest of the landscape.
Regardless of the fencing style that you may choose, there are practical reasons for fencing and there are reasons for landscaping style. Both reasons can be blended and both purposes can be achieved with a little planning. Get out and about and do some window-shopping to determine what fencing styles abound in your area, just to get an idea of what is available. There is nothing like seeing, and then you can begin planning your garden fencing in earnest.

Wood Working Tips

Great Woodworking Tips

Wood is an amazing material to create items from. Woodworking can result in creative items, from tables to simple bookshelves. Knowing how to work with wood is important. Keep reading to learn how to become a more successful woodworker.

Once you have selected the best woodworking workshop from our great selection , keep up to date with our woodworking tips and hints on our Wood Working Blog Page

Select the correct wood to complete your project properly. Some wood is stronger than others, while other woods need to be soft for what it is you’re doing. If you are unsure of how each type of wood will react to what you are trying to accomplish, you should spend some time learning about them first.

TIP! One good product to use if you are staining your project is a conditioner, to be used before staining. By using these products, you are likely to avoid blotching or imperfections in the final product.

Do some dry fitting before applying glue and then piece the wooden pieces together. If you try adjusting things post-gluing, there’s a big chance that you’ll damage something. Dry-fits help you see what components go in what locations.

Look around your neighborhood and workplace for sources of free wood. Some business have excess wood pallets lying around and will give them away if you’ll collect them. Look online for some more ideas.

Use more than just tape measures. Story sticks can help you out and it’s wise to slowly work up to the cut you want. Practicing on scraps first is a great way to try various fittings. Having more than one way to approach a cut keeps things fresh and interesting, avoiding boredom and accidents from mental lapses.

TIP! Stair gauges may be just the ticket for crosscut guides. Clamp them on the carpenter’s square and be sure they match up.

Start out by using kits. These kits contain pre-cut wood to ensure your project is a success. That lets you focus on getting a handle on woodworking. This will save money too because you won’t make as many mistakes.

Try to keep an eye out for furniture others are getting rid of. These pieces will often have useful pieces of wood you can use yourself. Stop to think about other prospects before pushing aside what you’re seeing. If the dresser is not useful, do something with the drawers.

Something can always fly toward your eyes and cause damage. Wearing goggles can save your vision. Purchase a pair of goggles that fit on your head comfortably.

TIP! Are you aware that your workbench height is essential for having successful woodworking projects? It should hit at your midline. This is how tall your bench should be.

Several hand tools should be a part of your arsenal. The first tool you get needs to be a hammer. A claw hammer is the best type for woodworking. Select one that feels comfortable in your hand. You certainly don’t want a tool that’s too heavy to lift.

Your woodworking area should be well-lit. Whenever you are working with wood, you need bright light. That way, you can spot the areas that need more sanding. Also, extra lights will allow you to see that the stain is being applied evenly.

Check the wood stain out that you’re using on a spot that’s inconspicuous first. The stain may not look as you expect, or you may have problems applying the stain that you didn’t foresee. By looking at the stain beforehand on a spot you aren’t too worried about, you can make some changes if you have to. This technique will save you a lot of work and headaches in the end.

TIP! When renting tools that you are unfamiliar with, speak with the company about getting a lesson on how to use it. Many times the people who work there will give you a quick demonstration on how to correctly use the tool.

It is important to be patient. Many people begin woodworking projects but become frustrated when it takes so much time to finish them. Keep in mind that your finished project is somewhere inside that piece of wood. Patience will help you be successful at woodworking. Soon enough that project you’re working on will be finished!

Prep your wood for stain. You can do this by using the pre-staining conditioner. These wood conditioners soak into the wood’s grain and help it to evenly soak up the stain. Lastly, after your stain is on, use a rag to remove excess product.

Write down your measurements to get them right every time. Do this on both sides. If you can’t read your markings, use an address label.

TIP! A golf tee can fix loose door hinges. Take the door from the frame than then tap in the tee into the screw holes.

Rent tools instead of buying. Renting a tool that you’re using just once or twice will help you to figure out if it’s something you really need. The renter will also demonstrate how to use the tool in a safe and proper manner.

Most folks lack the ability to see all of the wonderful things a plain block of wood can be transformed into. If you are unlike those people, then you will enjoy the information contained here. These tips will help you enjoy woodworking.

T&C

TERMS &CONDITIONS

Placing an Order

1.1. By placing an order on this web site, our associated web sites or in person at our factory show site or agents you are consenting to the following Terms and Conditions.
If you are in doubt in any way with any part of the details below – please do NOT place an order with ourselves or our agents until have made your self totally comfit-able and fully understand our terms. You are welcome to phone – 0151 345 6649 email info@citycentresheds.co.uk to make an appointment so a member of staff can explain and elaborate any part of our conditions of sale you do not 100% understand
1.2. Our acceptance of your order brings into existence a legally binding contract. Seek legal advice if you are unsure and do not order until you are happy to do so.
1.3. Legal ownership of any goods will not pass to you until full payment has been received. By placing an order with ourselves you agree to this and will allow us full unobstructed access on to your property to allow us to remove our goods you have not paid for or there is any dispute regarding workmanship. You will do this without any let or hindrance what so ever during the hours of 8 am to 6 pm – 7 days a week.
It will not be a matter of us trespassing on your property simply us entering your property as you have confirmed under this agreement.
As such you agree not to call the Police and waste public time and money by claiming we are trespassing. You agree NOT to waste Police Time.
Trespassing only retrieving our goods you have not paid for and for which you have agreed to allow us to collect due to none payment or dispute. This is a civil matter and not a Police ( criminal )matter
1.4. Should you obtain goods prior to full order payment, you accept that we retain the right to demand and receive an immediate settlement of outstanding payment prior to transfer of ownership or grant us unrestricted access to reclaim the goods.
At this point, a cancellation process shall be instigated.

Payment:

1.0 Full payment is expected before the building leaves our factory.

In the even, we have made special arrangements with you which will be done via dated and timed email.  On some of our larger jobs over £10,000, we will allow you to pay a deposit of say 50% on order the 40% on the day before delivery the final 10% payable when the job has been completed.

We do NOT offer credit, buy now pay later, send goods on approval or pay for it when it suits you type of arrangements.

In the case of any workmanship/material dispute, we will allow you to hold back that 10% until we return to fix any issues but retain the right to remove our goods and offer a refund.
This does NOT entitle you to withhold payment other than the 10 % mentioned above.
We will charge a minimum £50 per week interest on outstanding amounts under £5000 £75 per week for £5001 to £8000 and £100 per week on £8001 plus
1.1 Credit Card Payments will attract an additional 4% surcharge if you have not ordered directly from the web site using its preset pricing features.
This is important as on the larger more expensive bespoke buildings and cabins this fee may start adding up to a sizable amount.
This surcharge is a fee we are charged by the credit card companies for handling the transaction we do not make any money from this.
The only way around this is to make a direct bank transfer ( details will be provided upon request )
We always recommend you by either card or bank transfer rather than cash, but this is ultimately the client’s discretion.
2.1 Collecting of outstanding debts – in the case of dispute and or outstanding payments we may use the services of an external debt collecting service to recover our monies.
Any fees charged by these collection services will be added to your bill, so it is strongly advised you take legal advice before letting this issue get out of hand. By paying a deposit confirms your willingness to agree to all terms and conditions stated.
2.2. This site is a portal to not only buildings City Centre Sheds supply but also to other suppliers and retailers. So as such all prices shown on our websites or price lists are in (£) Pounds Sterling, and include any duty applicable that may need to be charged by that supplier.
Because of the complex VAT laws, some smaller suppliers are not VAT resisted or Zero rated because they do not claim back VAT on their purchases.
All prices are current at the time ordered and rate, errors and omission excepted.
2.3. Free delivery is included in the price in the Merseyside / Wirral / Manchester Area unless stated otherwise, and an additional charge is applicable depending upon the delivery area and goods/services are required.

2.4. You shall be notified prior to acceptance of the order if there is an amendment or alteration to the price of the goods or services.

2.5. The manufacturers reserve the right to change the specification of their products at any time which is mainly due to Tech / Structural alterations that will eventually lead to a better product.
If the price has been amended or altered, you will be entitled to cancel the order and receive a full refund where applicable.
2.6. A non-refundable deposit of at least 10% for goods or services must be made at the time of order. Please take your time and DO NOT place an order until you have made whatever arrangements you feel you need to ensure you have your site ready for this new building. Do not commit your self to a delivery date when placing an order unless you have all your groundwork and clear access to the site ready.
Delivery:
2.6.1 None payment of goods on the day of delivery – if you have not pre-paid for your product and have opted to pay on the day of delivery – “Cash on delivery”.
We expect payment before the lads leave the job or the building will be dismantled and removed Our profits are very tight nowadays and we do NOT offer credit or extended payment terms.
Cash on delivery means CASH – NOT Cheque or credit card.
3.1. We will arrange delivery of the goods at the earliest opportunity and can not be held responsible for any time you may or may not have taken of work and do not cover any money or financial loss you may have at this or any time.
3.2. All delivery dates or lead times stated are approximate only and are given by ‘The SUPPLIERS’ in good faith for indication purposes only. We cannot guarantee specific delivery dates or times, and cannot be held responsible for delays which are out of our direct control, including (but not limited to) manufacturing problems and third party contracted companies.
3.3. We shall not be responsible for any delays caused due to incorrect or incomplete information being submitted by the Customer or their agents.
3.4. Delivery only – any products that are marked for delivery only shall be made to the curbside/ roadside only and it shall be at the discretion of the delivery driver to move the goods to an alternative point at the delivery property.
Unless you have paid for the erecting service or are making use of our Free erecting service, only one man will arrive with the building and can not be expected to lift heavy sections through your house or down driveways on his own and if you feel you will not be able to assist then we need to know in advance.
3.5. It is your responsibility to provide suitable clear/clean of Dog Muck access for delivery and notify us of any concerns, in writing, at the point of order. Not on the day of delivery.
In this instance, you will be liable for any failure or return delivery charges. Within our standard quote, we have only allowed for a two man delivery team who will deliver and instal the building with 30 meters of the point where the truck can park.
As some of our sections, especially on our heavy duty workshops, are extremely large, heavy and bulky. If when our team arrive and you have not informed us in advance they have limited access or walks of over 30 meters over a flat solid, level unobstructed surface.
3.6. A valid signature from you or your representative is required upon delivery, at which point you bear all responsibility and risk.
Failure to provide or you not be available to sign we will take it that you will agree that you are happy with the goods and services we have supplied unless you inform us via email – info@citycentresheds.co.uk of your concerns with 24 hours of that original delivery.
3.6.1. If you are not available to sign for the goods upon delivery, then either prior written acceptance of responsibility must be authorized by us allowing the goods to be left unattended.
If written acceptance of responsibility is not received prior to delivery, you will be liable for the failed and/or return delivery charges.
By making payment more than 24 hours after delivery has taken place it will be taken as confirmation you are happy with the product or services we have supplied and have no grounds for a refund or recall.
3.7. Goods must be examined within a reasonable time of delivery ( 24 hours) and all damages or shortages or concerns must be reported as soon as possible firstly by via email info@citycentresheds.co.uk as it is dated and times so there is no confusion.
Then via telephone after your email to 0151 345 6649 as we now record all phone conversations and thereafter
The Company will not accept any telephone claims which are not backed up immediately in writing via email. The simple facts are people tell lies and twist situations to suit themselves – dated emails do not.
3.7.1. No responsibility for transit damage will be accepted after 24hrs from the time of delivery.
3.7.2. If damage has occurred to sectional goods during transit, each section will be classed as an individual item.
We reserve the right to replace only the damaged sections and can decline any replacement when the damage has been caused by the customer through misuse, neglect, self-assembly, works carried out by others or incorrect storage. Minor superficial damage caused during transit will not be accepted as grounds for rejection or request for a refund.
Timber sections tend to be large, bulky and heavy and if you have any concern about any damage these sections may cause to any part of your property or outbuildings.
Whilst being transferred to its site then you are at-lib to carry them through to site your self personally then the fitters can erect once you have the building in place.
We will not deliver buildings to Premises where our staff consider it to be dangerous or the building may be of a historical nature or the client has not made clear unobstructed access to the site.
3.8. You should not begin the installation, or arrange any third-party installation until the product has been fully inspected for damage, missing parts or has been made to the specification you have agreed on. We shall not be liable for any costs incurred by ‘The Customer’, should they fail to inspect and satisfy themselves that the product is sound and complete prior to self-assembly or continuation of any other works.
4.1. Some of our products are sold and supplied for self-assembly only so please check individual products and pricing structures.
4.2. If an installation service is available, and has been requested, The Customer must ensure that a flat, level and square base, capable of carrying considerable weight, has been provided before we arrive on site any delays while waiting for this base to be completed will be charged to you at a minimum charge of £50 per hour or any part of .
4.2.1. The site should be clear of overhanging branches or obstructions and have sufficient unobstructed access (minimum 600mm) around the site for the safe erecting and maintenance of the building. If the base does not meet the required standards, when our fitter arrive  you will be liable for the aborted labor costs minimum £60 ( sheds ) £200 ( Workshops ) £500 ( Log Cabins )  or  (a minimum 10% of the product price, whichever is greater), and the product will be left for self-assembly.
Upon receipt of the aborted labor fee, we will then make separate arrangements to return and complete the job.
4.2.2. Should The Customer require a return installation service it will be carried out at a time convenient to both parties involved and will not be dictated by the client.
4.3. The Customer must ensure that the installer’s vehicle can be parked as close as possible to the installation site. If a parking area cannot be located nearby the site, the installation may be abandoned and a return charge (as defined in 4.2.1. And
4.2.2.)The Customer will be liable for any costs incurred by the installation team (metered parking etc.) during the installation period. Or any Parking fines caused due to the client not providing safe of road parking.
4.4 The Customer must provide reasonable access to toilet facilities if we are on-site for more than 2 hours. Failure to provide these facilities may require the lads to leave the site to use other facilities nearby.
This extra time will be changed to you as quoted above at a minimum charge of £50 for lost time and inconvenience you have caused by not providing such facilities.
4.5 You the customer will be responsible for the removal of all rubble/materials/packing cases / covering sheets once the fitters have finished the job of erecting your building.
We have made No provision of Skips / Wagons or the likes to remove any waste as this will become your liability unless you have received a dated and time email quote for such services and paid the relevant fee.
Cancellations:
5.1. If the goods have not been delivered, you can cancel the contract at any time from the day the contract is made until the expiry of 14 days following the day after receipt of the goods ( Log Cabins Excluded )(except as defined in 5.2.). Cancellations must be made in writing either by fax or email. Letters are no longer classed as being reliable means of delivery
5.1.1. An additional charge may be made if the order is canceled after delivery has been scheduled by a third party.
5.2. The Customer has no right to cancel at any time if the order includes special order items, non-standard options, adaptations, or personalized preferences.
Buildings ordered for delivery direct to the customer from overseas (e.g. Log cabins) are non-returnable, and cannot be canceled once shipping has commenced.
DO NOT place an order until you have all the funds available and all the relevant planning permissions in place.
5.3. Minor cosmetic damage, and natural variances in timber buildings such as knots, natural cracks and shakes are not classed as imperfections or flaws, and not classed as faulty goods as they are naturally occurring factors you must accept when buying a softwood timber building.
5.4. We will not accept any return or cancellation if the goods have been altered, assembled, painted or customized in any way.
Liability:
6.1. We will not accept liability for any product which does not meet The Customers required dimensions, unless the exact dimensions have been obtained in writing from us, prior to order.
All sizes shown are quoted as approximate Roof sizes and NOT floor sizes and may be changed at any time. This is especially important when you are ordering a custom / bespoke building.
Unless you provide us with detailed drawings setting out heights of windows/doors and any other features that are of concern to you then will provide what we consider to be our nearest thing too!
By this, we mean using standard stock materials that meet and match up as they are placed on the bench during manufacture.
6.1.a. The biggest single problem we encounter is on larger buildings the sections are very heavy and bulky and these need to be made in a number of smaller parts.
So as such due to timber shrinkage and the movement it may be the case where these sections do not line up when fitted on site.
This is something you will simply have to accept unless you are paying for a premium upgrade  Laminated man-made product, where we need to buy longer and more expensive timbers.
Once again any concerns you have over these facts will need to be put in writing with you full buildings requirements.
6.2. The Customer should check before ordering that the building will be suitable for it’s intended purpose and that it meets any planning regulations, local or national that may be in force for that type or size building. We can not offer any form of refund part or fully due to your neglect in ensuring the building you have ordered meets local planning regulations for height or size.
6.3. The Supplier will not accept liability for any issues caused by the installation of any product by a third party.
6.4. If you do not receive goods ordered within 30 days of the date ordered (unless a longer delivery time had been agreed), we shall have no liability to you unless notified in writing at our contact address of the problem within 40 days of the date on which you ordered the goods.
6.4. If we (or our suppliers) are unable to supply your order, we will refund you in full as soon as possible. We will not be obliged to pay any compensation for disappointment or inconvenience or the likes.
6.5. We will not be liable( a) for losses that were unforeseeable to both parties when the order was made,( b) for losses that were not caused by any breach on behalf.
Timber Shrinkage or Damage
7.0 Timber is a naturally grown product and as such it totally beyond our control and in the hands of nature.
Although we hand-select the timber the best we can, unfortunately, we can be held responsible for any Shrinkage / Warping or Shakes what so ever as it is a naturally occurring event.
7.1 Your new building may or may not depending on the product, have received a base coat of water-based treatment as standard practice, however it is vital that ANY new timber is treated within its first 14 days with a high quality “spirit-based” timber preservative. We will need to be informed via email with evidence of this process and include pictures so we can compare the before and after.
Failure to do this very important process will immediately null and void your Guarantee
7.2. Your Timber Building must be treated on at least an annual basis is with a good quality “Spirit Based” preservative to ensure it stays waterproof. For our 10-year warranty to be withheld you will need documentary evidence of this fact that this process has been carried out correctly.
We do offer an optional annual retreating service if required at an extra charge.
7.3 If you are not prepared to accept the facts stated above, we suggest you do not order a timber building and buy a man-made. Plastic or metal alternative.
10 Year Warranty 
8.1. Our 10-year warranty covers all our timber garden buildings and is subject to strict terms and conditions.
8.2 The building must be treated at the very least every 12 months using one of our approved quality Timber Care Products.
We must see photo evidence of this work before and after work by sending us dated photos of that work.
8.3 Only a quality spirit based time preserve must be used. Cheaper water-based treatments are NOT recommended and as such void any warranty
Our Prices
9.0 All our prices are fixed at the very best possible Discount. We do not enter into bartering or haggling over prices.
9.1 All buildings must be prepaid in full before leaving our factory unless an agreement to pay Cash on Delivery has been made in writing via email.
9.2 We do NOT take Cheques or Credit Cards on delivery these forms of payment must be cleared before delivery
9.3 We do NOT offer credit terms
9.4 Our prices include FREE delivery and erecting in the Merseyside or within 30 miles from L10AH only – outside that area you will be expected to pay an additional delivery charge to cover the extra fuel which will be pre-arranged.
9.5 Our prices quoted does NOT include any alterations – the adding of extra none standard windows – moving of door positions fall under our custom build prices.
Whoever we are flexible on certain items but can NOT be held responsible if your requests are not carried out unless you pay extra.
Our offer of alterations “free of charge”  are always subject to workload and what stock sections we have available at that time and this offer may be withdrawn at any time.
Complaints and Repairs 
 
10 In the event, there is a problem with your new garden shed, summer house or cabin we will where ever possible get out to evaluate the problem or complaint within 3 weeks. Once our staff have been out and made their assessment we will deal with the issue in a timely manner which will normally be with 21 days of that VIST.
10.1 If after our staff have made a return visit to your building and carried out repairs / replaced parts and you are still not happy then it will be a case that you contact trading standards for their advice.
10.2 If you have made any alterations, cut holes, apertures or altered the building in any way we reserve the right to no deal with any issues these alterations may have caused.
10.3 If you have fitted electric’s, water or any other outside services to that building without informing in writing and via email, we reserve the right not to work on that building until those services are removed.
10.4 All correspondence must be due via a dated and timed email so there can never be any dispute about what has or has not been agreed. We DO NOT or will not make agreements over the telephone.
Timber Budlings – Roofs 
11. Certain timber buildings such as Pent single sloping roof sheds if not positioned in your garden correctly can be prone to prevailing winds, which cause water to be forced under the overlapping joint on the roofing felt.
We must make it clear that if you intend to fit electric’s or any valuable items into any sort of Pent single sloping roof shed you MUST pay for an upgrade to the polyester torch on roofing felt.
11.1 We will NOT guarantee any PENT ROOF shed unless you upgrade the roof covering, as we erect our building FREE of charge you have NOT paid a FEE of any sort so we can NOT be held responsible for any losses or damaged caused. If in any doubt what so ever please take legal advice and do not buy the building until you have done so.
11.2 Failure to comply with the above request will not entitle you to any form of refund be it partial or in full due to water ingression into that building unless it has been covered with the upgraded torch on roofing felt
Fitting of Electrics in Timber Buildings.
12 It is now a legal requirement to have ANY electrical work carried out by an approved contractor be it in your home or your garden.
This is especially important in timber, should an electrical short circuit occur because of the nature of timber it could become an instant fire hazard.
12.1 We have seen an increase in the amount of insurance claims being made due to fire and as part of an agreement with our insurers that any client who installs electric’s into a building we supply MUST inform us in writing and via email – info@citycentresheds.co.uk with documentary evidence that a fully qualified electrician has installed that service to the current regulations.
12.2 We as a business DO NOT install electric’s or remove electric’s as we have not got the correct legal qualifications to do so.
However, we can advise you to a list of local contractors who are legally able to do such work at an extra cost.
12.3 It is vitally important that you do NOT install any form of electrical, insulation or lining in any building we supply until you have firstly inspected that building and are happy with its construction and any others services we may have provided.
If we do not receive a dated email from you detailing your concerns and you continue with any form of work we can only conceder you are prepared to accept the condition we have left the building in by continuing with such work.
In the rare case, we may have to remove the building and make a refund we will not make be making any allowances or refunding you for work you may have done on or in that building.
By this we mean supping and fitting power or lights, lining and insulating and part of that build, as this was done totally at your risk as clearly stated above
Timber Playhouses
13.0 As explained above and within our site – Timber is a natural product and as such beyond human control, it does and will develop, splinters, cracks and other natural defects due to it’s it natural processes.
13.1 We highly recommend as with any product you intend your children to use.
You the buyer/parent fully inspect the building before letting any child use it. If you feel it is NOT safe in any way DO NOT allow anyone to use that building until the issues of concern are dealt with either by your self in the case of naturally occurring problems or in the case of more major issues by our selves.
13.2. DO NOT buy a timber-based product of this nature unless you prepared to accept this fact. Buy plastic or other man-made material that can be stabilized.
Timber Treatments
14. Most of our sectional buildings receive a base coat of water-based treatment, this is provided free of charge. It is vital you retreat your new building with the first few days of it being exposed to the elements. It must be treated with good quality branded spirited based and NOT a water-based treatment. Failure to provide this vital coat of treatment will automatically null and void your warranty with the suppliers ( see section 10)
Refunds
15. We offer a full refund on any product we supply within 21 days of its original delivery to your site, but only on the grounds of disputed workmanship or general the quality of the product.
15.1. This refund is subject to the building being in as near to the original state it was delivered in
15.2 Any damage you may have caused by drilling into the structure of the building, any additional timbers you may have added at your expense will need to be assessed and a suitable deduction made for the damage you may have caused to that product.
You must understand that building will need to be sold on again and by you drilling holes, painting it the color of your choice leave the building in a much less valuable condition.
If this is the case we will take photos of the work you have carried out so as this can be used in our favor to show as evidence of the damage/alterations you have caused that building to in case of any legal case that may be taken by either party.
15.3 no matter how you may have paid in the first instance we will only ever refund via credit card system or Bank transfer or cheque, so as we have clear documented evidence that you have been correctly refunded. We do NOT refund by CASH even if you paid by CASH.
See Payment Information Page for full refund information
Interlocking Log Cabins
16. These building generally tend to be much heavier construction compared to most other timber buildings and as such do not come under our normal conditions of sale relating to delivery.
Because of their size and weight. In most cases, our prices include FREE with 100 miles of Liverpool but an individual price will be quoted based upon the postcode you provide, plus the size and weight of the building.
16.1 Interlocking buildings do NOT fall into our Free erecting service.
A separate individual price will be quoted for each and every building. The erecting price we quote of the web is only a price guide and may NOT be the final price.
As there are so many factors we need to consider such as access, ground conditions and much more until you provide us with full details it must be taken that our price on this web site is only a guide. Once you have supplied more in-depth information which will be passed on to the fitting teams you will then be provided with an emailed quote for that service.
16.2 A minimum 50% will be required for us to actually place an order with the Mill where the buildings are being manufactured. Once this deposit is cleared with 5 to 10 days you will be provided with a set of drawing via email.
You will need to fully inspect those drawings and take into account any items or alterations you may have requested.
At this point, the building will not have gone into production. If you are not happy with or need any alterations then this is the time to do it, you will need to clearly mark on the plans and detail as best you can in writing and changes you may require.
This will then be sent back to the mill where a fresh set of plans will be provided, again this new set of plans will be emailed to you for your approval. The longer you delay or keep changing things the longer your delivery will take.
NO building will be put into production until singed plans have been emailed to us. We cannot be blamed for delivery delays due to your change of plans.
16.3. No refund will be given what so ever once the building has gone into production as you will have had may days if not weeks to change your mind and this building will be being made solely for you as per the drawings we have provided.
Changes To T+Cs 
This contently changing times we live in we reserve the right to adjust and amend our T+Cs on a regular basis.
We strongly advise you look over these conditions before you place an order.
There is nothing sinister or underhanded within our terms, but what is happening generally with consumers is a certain element is trying to use loopholes and clauses or the shortage of them to obtain refunds, alterations or make false malaises claims of promises or the likes

British Made

Your Guide to British Made Timber Products

The British timber trade has a long history. In the Middle Ages, Britain had large domestic timber supplies, with the most common and famous British timber being oak. Later, however, as domestic supply became unable to meet local demand the British imported timber from the Baltic, and later North America.

Being an island, Great Britain has always been a major consumer of wood, and increasing shipbuilding demands in the run-up to the Industrial Revolution meant that domestic wood became incredibly expensive.

Even when iron replaced wood as a major component in shipbuilding, there were other industries that were huge consumers of wood, so it was difficult to find affordable timber for use in our UK Workshops making flooring, furniture, house-building, doors and other non-industrial products.

Importing timber was a popular option, but the quality of the wood that was imported was not always up-to scratch compared to British grown oaks and hardwoods.

Even today, British made timber products are regarded as some of the highest quality.

The UK Timber Industry

The British Timber industry is still an important part of the UK economy, to the extent that there is a major expo held in the UK, called the Timber Expo. This event is an important part of the UK construction industry’s calendar, and it tends to take place alongside the London Design Festival.

The Timber Expo promotes the latest and most innovative ideas in the world of British Timber. This year’s expo is due to take place on October 7th and 8th, and will focus on sustainable timber, the construction industry and innovation.

In 2013, the World scape was a core feature of the expo. The Expandable Surface System – a display made using a morphogenetic process from the bottom up, out of birch plywood sheets, was one of the most eye-catching displays, and there were other amazing plywood sculptures showing off how flexible versatile and strong timber can be.

Buying Timber

The best place to buy timber from is a specialist such as British Hardwoods or UK Oak Doors. These companies specialise in making domestic products such as doors, mouldings’ and flooring out of British Timber, and have many years of experience in producing high quality products.

Caring for Timber

British made timber products are in high demand because they are so high quality and durable. It is important that you take care of your purchase. Timber products are great long-term investments and if you look after them properly then they will give you many years of enjoyment.

When you purchase British made timber products it is likely that the installer or builder will give you some basic care instructions. You should, of course, follow their instructions to the letter. However, these rules of thumb will help you to look after your wooden product if the installer does not provide you with detailed instructions:

Firstly, if you paint or varnish a timber floor, wait at least 48 hours before placing furniture. This will give the varnish time to dry and set completely so that you do not end up with unsightly marks or dents.

Fit protective pads to the bottom of the furniture to reduce the chances of the floor being marked. If you are using furniture with castors, choose barrel castors over ball castors when a choice is available. Use protective matting to prevent damage.

Wait at least two weeks before laying rugs onto a coated floor, and clean the floor thoroughly before putting the rug down. If you fail to do this, then the dirt trapped under the rug could end up scratching, scuffing or otherwise damaging the floor.

Timber Does Change Colour

It is perfectly normal for timber to change color over time. Some woods get darker, while others tend to fade. Timber that is exposed to sunlight (such as external doors or moldings, or window frames) will fade or darken more quickly than timber that is kept indoors out of direct sunlight.

There is little that you can do to prevent this except to use an appropriate wood stain that is designed to protect the timber from the elements.

If the finish of the wood becomes scuffed, scratched or dented then it can be re-finished, filled in with wood filler and repaired.  The best way to clean hardwood timber products is to vacuum clean them with a soft bristle head or using an electrostatic attachment to remove the worst dust and grit. Stubborn dirt can be removed using a damp mop and a pH neutral cleaner. Do not use polish, household detergent, wax or steel wood pads on timber products because these can damage the finish and may even damage the underlying wood. In addition, use lint-free mops and make sure that you wash them before the first wash.

If you accidentally spill something on wooden furniture, wipe it up using a dry, absorbent paper towel. If you spill something sticky, moisten the cloth slightly to make it easier to pick up all of the spill.

Timber products that are designed to be used outdoors require special care. To keep hardwood timber furniture and decking looking as good as possible, clean it regularly and take some time to refinish it at least once a year. Some manufacturers may recommend that decking be refinished more than once a year. It is important that furniture be cleaned and wiped down regularly, because it is easy for mold, moss and algae to build up on wood if it is allowed to sit damp for a prolonged period of time.

If you are thinking of buying British made timber products, look for a reputable supplier that uses FSC certified wood.

This will help you to ensure that you are buying only sustainable British timber. Remember that timber bought from suppliers that use only sustainable grown wood is actually good for the environment compared to purchasing UPVC or other materials.

The carbon impact of sustainable furniture is quite low, so you are doing your bit for the environment if you buy it and take care of it.